Oliver + S

Stupid things I’ve done while sewing O&S patterns

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 157 total)
  • LINK
    Masha Richart
    Moderator
    @roundtheworldgirl

    Lightning – I also do that, just about every single time.

    LINK
    Nicole @motherof5

    Oh no,I again count my blessings that I have a sewing room! With all my stuff in it!

    LINK
    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    It Really would pay to read the pattern instructions before taking scissors to fabric… I’ve just cut out three hopscotch tops/dresses and made bold triangular knicks in the fabric at the pattern marks. Then I read the instructions regarding the 1/4″ seam and not cutting into it. Darn.

    LINK
    Tamara @justsewit

    I agree and reading the size of the pattern piece wouldn’t go astray either. I was cutting out my daughter’s size 12 pajama tops using the sleepover pattern and realised halfway through cutting the contrast piece that it was the size 8 (meant for my son) not the 12 that was required for the pink pair – lol! Luckily there was enough fabric to recut.

    LINK
    Jennifer1568 @Jennifer1568

    Lightning, I’ve done that. I have done it more than once. I am a slow learner.

    LINK
    KarenK @KarenK

    I sewed the shoulder ruffles of the Badminton dress yoke between the notches— but they weren’t between the shoulder notches…they were between the shoulder notches on either side of the front and back neckline. What a mess that was to unpick and fix. I may or may not have used a fewer level 2 swear words.

    LINK
    Jenny @Jenny

    1. Made a whole little army of Sailboat tops for my daughter and her little cousins….attached the size 6 back to the size 5 garment and vice versa and had to take off 4 sleeves (the night before my deadline, of course) to fix.

    2. Got all chuffed with myself for cutting out three little red riding hood capes from fabric purchased for two. Began sewing all three assembly-line style. When I got up to the center hood piece, panicked because I didn’t think I had cut out the piece from the fabric (getting all three cut out had taken such jigsawing) and then as my panic spiraled, mistook the back pocket piece for the backpack (Little Things to Sew pattern 16 as opposed to 18) for the (not) missing piece (I really didn’t know what shape I was looking for and am not good at Space) and so decided to sacrifice my daughter’s cape for the sake of the two birthday girls who were getting the other ones.

    3. Discovered that I’d had the right piece all along and had wrecked my daughter’s cape for nothing.

    4. Discovered that due to all the jigsawing, I’d cut half of the lining pieces out–Moda’s Walk in the Woods, featuring Little Red Riding Hoods and what really look much more like foxes–upside down. I ended up finishing and giving one of the capes away anyway, but my daughter and one of her friends got IOUs….the replacement fabric just arrived the other day. Sigh.

    LINK
    Nicole @motherof5

    Oh Karen&Jenny! Oh,I think level 2 words are understandable!

    In fact probably mandatory……

    LINK
    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Lightning, I have the same situation — the kid & the supplies share a space, so whatever I forget to sneak out has to wait till the next night. The other night I was so eager to try something out, I actually brought out my whole sewing machine and set it up on my daughter’s IKEA play table. The sewing machine is so heavy, and the table so light, it started bouncing right off the edge. I’m lucky to still have all my fingers!

    And Jenny and Karen, you have my sympathy — I have been there more times than I care to admit.

    LINK
    emstone @emstone

    After cutting out the back of the Hopscotch dress into two pieces (not on the fold) and sitting there for about 10 minutes trying to figure out if I had enough fabric to cut another piece (which I did not) I made the same mistake again for the front piece. I still put it together but it looks a little off with seams going down the center front and back. Hopefully the next time I will remember!

    LINK
    Masha Richart
    Moderator
    @roundtheworldgirl

    Just now, while sewing a Class Picnic top (despite the fact that I was supposed to be done, since we are moving in 9 days), I accidentally sewed the back yoke facing to the right side of back panel. I decided not to bother to pick it out – the understitching will show, but maybe then my husband will remember that that is the back of the shirt. Then, after attaching both sleeves to the front panel, I attached the back panel backwards and didn’t notice until I’d already trimmed the seam allowance. This pattern is so easy and yet I always mess it up.

    LINK
    Nicole @motherof5

    Sewn my SECOND Apple Picking dress with the placket buttoning on the BOY side!

    Did I mention I diligently photographed it to do a tutorial!

    Grrrrrrrrrrrr

    LINK
    Jane @jesims

    Oh how happy I am that I have read this! My husband always tells me I need to slow down and read the directions as I am cursing my seam ripper for the 10th time on a project. 😉

    My most recent mistake was to sew the yoke of an ice cream dress on inside out. I read and re-read the directions and swore I was right. I wasn’t.

    LINK
    Jennifer1568 @Jennifer1568

    I hate it when I sew the wrong sides together like when right sides are supposed to be together and I sew a wrong side to a right side. I have done that more than once or twice.

    LINK
    Emily @Emily

    I’m doing french seams on the sides of three Family Reunion dresses that I’m doing assembly-line style. On TWO of them, I sewed one of the side seams with right sides together initially, so I had to pick it out and do it over. Argh. At least I’ve learned from my lack of attention – the third is pinned together for the side seams, and I very intentionally and carefully pinned the wrong sides together so I can’t possibly do it wrong when I pick it up to work on it again.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 157 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

copyright

Unless otherwise credited, all work on this blog is © Liesl + Co., Inc, 2008-2019. You are welcome to link to this blog, but please ask permission before using any text or images.