Oliver + S

Sewing with Silk Dupioni

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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    MyBellaGirl @MyBellaGirl

    Hello,

    I really haven’t branched out beyond good old cotton yet, but I want to make a dress using silk dupioni for the holidays. Can anyone give me some advice about working with this fabric?

    Are there any other “special occasion” fabrics that are user friendly? Thank you for your help!

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    I love dupioni. It’s quite easy to sew, really. Use a new needle (I use all-purpose needles, which really are almost all-purpose except for very fine or very heavy fabrics) and remember that the dupioni frays quite a bit. It also shrinks, so pre-wash your fabric. I always wash silk by hand and almost never dry clean it, especially for kids’ clothes.

    Seams can slip a bit, meaning that if you pull on the fabric at either side of a seam little holes can develop at the seamline. There are a few ways to combat this: You could use French seams where appropriate, select a loose-fitting pattern that won’t be very tight anywhere, or stitch a second seamline just inside the first one and press the seam allowances to one side where appropriate.

    In general, just give yourself a chance to practice with the fabric a bit before you get started. And be sure to finish your seam allowances as you go (or even before you start, if possible) to avoid all that fraying.

    Have fun with it! Can anyone think of anything to add?

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Gah, wish I’d seen this yesterday. So far the silk is easy to sew, it’s almost like paper, but I’m worried it will be really fragile. I’m making a mental note to have the camera ready and the baby in a good mood before I try it on her, in case it doesn’t make it to a second wearing.

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Sarvi, silk is surprisingly strong. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

    Here are some links to blog posts I wrote over at Burda Style about silk and various fibers in fabrics. You may find a little additional information there about other fibers you’re interested in sewing:

    http://www.burdastyle.com/blog/natural-fibers-used-for-manufacturing-fabric

    http://www.burdastyle.com/blog/liesl-gibson-on-her-favorite-sewing-fabrics

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Thank you, Liesl, those articles are fascinating. If anything, I wish you had space to go on longer. My husband was just asking me the other day what linen is made from.

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    Kim @kmac0107

    I am researching silk dupioni for the fairy tale dress and I think this is a great thread to read.

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    cybele727 @cybele727

    I bought silk dupioni which is why I am so obsessive about the fairy tale bodice right now. 😉

    So I really appreciate all these tips!

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I adore sewing with silk!

    I wash it in my machine with no trouble at all!

    ~Nicole~

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    cybele727 @cybele727

    Before I was, should I zig zag the raw edges to prevent fraying in the machine??

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    Nicole @motherof5

    It can fray,some are worse then others.

    I would definitely neaten my raw edges,even those inside the lining but I don’t dry clean my silk.

    I do tend to neaten mine before sewing,just take care not to take any seam allowance off.

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    cybele727 @cybele727

    Thanks!

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    Jennifer1568 @Jennifer1568

    Do you think it is OK to turn the the fabric and cut perpendicular to the grain with Duponi silk for the bodice of the Fairy Tale dress?

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    cybele727 @cybele727

    Ok, I stitched my salvage about an 1/8 of away from the edge, just washed, and now I am drying low heat. The idea of washing the silk makes it a better option for a wee little girl dress.

    I am working on my bodice fitting, almost ready to pin, will say like 50 Hail Marys before I cut. (Apologies to any non believers or believers of other kinds).

    Now my next question is PINNING the silk. When you pin, you create almost permanent holes. Any suggestions/tips besides pinning in the seam allowance.

    Thanks

    Jenny

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    beachmom @beachmom

    What kind of pins do you have? There are “silk” pins that are for thin/delicate fabrics. They are thinner than the quilting pins.:)

    Cindy

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    Jennifer1568 @Jennifer1568

    Thanks for the articles, Liesl. They are very interesting. I like natural fabrics best, too. I like wool a lot.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)

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