Oliver + S

Sewing area

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 80 total)
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    cybele727 @cybele727

    Pattern Storage?

    For the originals, I put them in the envelop and then I put them in a shoe box, or I once bought this really neat pattern box, but shoe boxes are cheaper and you are recycling.

    For my tissue tracings, yes I fold them. Very carefully, and put them in a bag. I use a gallon ziplock bag, and write on the outside (Sailboat size 2). Before I put it in the bag, I hole punch three holes and after I am done, I put it in a 3 ring binder.

    Fabric is still challenging. πŸ™‚

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    Tamara @justsewit

    I have plastic crates I nicked from the toy storage when we were sorting out the kids’ rooms last year. They dont do the best job but I would love to have a hanging rack to store them so at least they are visible or drawers to have them like in the shops we get them from.I have lots of drafted patterns, some self and most from bought patterns. I can say though that with this particular format of storage, I am rough with them and hence I have had to replace some of them because they have fallen to bits. That is to do with lots of use too though.

    With fabric, alot of us fold it and store it that way. I used to have mine taking up a large bookcase but it over flowed really fast and the wardrobe was really a compulsory item to stop the mess. I have taken to hanging my quilting cottons and lighter fabrics and I can actually see what I have. The shelves are currently a huge jumble but they have the knits and corduroys and scraps. I find hanging the fabric if you can, a good way to see what you have and it doesnt take up anymore space than folding. It also looks neat and tidy.

    Lattemama, so laugh out loud funny! I bet hubby will be happy to reclaim the office space you currently have taken up and “come out of the closet” for good! I told my husband that part of your post and he was sitting there analysing it. At least I know what you meant by it. Love the play on words. Every girl needs a space of her own but I have to agree that the attic would be perfect for bedrooms not sewing spaces.

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I have my tracings in coloured files that come with clear plastic sheets, I have a file per pattern and I leave the first page or 2 empty and then label each sleeve with the size ie 6 to 12m, 12m-18m, 18m-24m, 2T to 12 and often I’ll add a 14 and 16 as weII in preparation for enlarging. l label the outside and spine of my files with the pattern company eg “Oliver and S” and the name of the pattern eg “field trip”. All the tracings for that pattern in that size go in the corresponding labeled clear plastic sleeve in the file. I find this system really good as I can quickly and easily identify and find the pattern and size I want. Also the files the files come in a choice of colour of the for the covers which helps my identification.

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    dubhels2003 @dubhels2003

    Hello, I’ve been reading through this thread as for the first time I’m about to get a dedicated sewing room and I’d love some advice and ideas about layout, storage etc. Mr room is pretty long and narrow with a window at the narrow far end. It is basically a single bedroom. It is being decorated at the mo, and I have my desk, pattern storage and fabric/notions storage pretty much sorted. The ironing board and iron will be in my sewing room.

    Until now I have had a couple of tins that I use depending on what I’m doing, so one tin with sewing scissors, thread snippers, bland and white thread, spool tin, tailors chalk, some needles etc in, another tin with a range of machine needles in, and so it goes on. I’m not sure that this will be the best way to keep things in the new room.

    What do you keep on and around your machine table? What do you keep out on your workspace and how do you store it, do you have a hanging rack in front of the table, for example? I’ve seen lots of ideas on the web, but I’m keen to hear ideas from people who have their little spaces.

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    That sounds very similar to my space. Because of the layout of the power outlets, I unfortunately have to have my desk at the opposite side from the window, so my back is to the window. I’ve mounted a wire rack to my left so when I’m sewing I can reach out with my left hand to grab scissors, different presser feet, point turner, or what have you. On my desk I have my sewing machine, serger right next to it, and my spool rack (which should be on the wall, just haven’t got to it yet. On the left side of my desk is a set of drawers which hold ribbons, zippers, buttons, etc. Regrettably, organization is not my strong suit, so the only thing I can really recommend from this setup is the wire rack. For a normal person, it would make tools very accessible, where for me it just serves as a visual reminder that I have misplaced all 500 thread snips and seam rippers.

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    cybele727 @cybele727

    I have a project box. A small box in which I keep the feet I will use, the buttons, the snips, the ripper, etc. So it is right next to me. Someone needs to start a pinterest board on sewing spaces! So we can visually see ideas.

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Ok, I’ve started the Pinterest board! Here is the link: http://www.pinterest.com/liesl/sewing-spaces/

    If you’d like to be a contributor just drop an email to information@oliverands.com and I can send you an invitation. I’ll need your Pinterest user name, so include that in your email.

    Also, what about an occasional blog post about different sewing spaces and organization ideas? It might help to inspire us. Anyone interested in contributing photos and a short write-up about your space?

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    cybele727 @cybele727

    Wow ask and ye shall receive! Thanks!

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    dubhels2003 @dubhels2003

    Yay! I’m happy to contribute and write something but it would probably be better written by someone who has had a sewing room for a while and has gone through the process of establishing what works for them and what doesn’t.

    I am really looking forward to sewing how other people organise their space.

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    honeymadeit @honeymadeit

    One of my more successful storage ideas is a plastic box intended for embroidery floss. It has small compartments that I use for my sewing machine feet. I keep it right behind the sewing machine so they are always handy. I also keep an assortment of different size and type needles in there. I wish all my ideas worked the way I imagined they would.

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    Nicole @motherof5

    When I have time (snigger) I will contribute. My eldest in planning and building me a storage system for my sewing room/children’s craft room, in his Gap year.

    It will be based on this http://www.pinterest.com/pin/73676143878252720/

    I am so lucky!

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I recently, like 2 weekends ago, raised up a table on PVC Pipe legs to serve as my cutting table. It is wonderful! I used to cut out and work at the kitchen bench but that really was still too low, my new surface is approximately 20cm (8″) higher (than the kitchen bench/counter). So much more comfortable to work at and more space πŸ™‚

    Here’s a link to the origninal inspiration.

    http://www.pinkchalkstudio.com/blog/2007/04/27/cutting-table/

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    Rebecca W @craftalittle

    A friend recommended these tables to me- http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/S19852113/#/S69857764

    I have 2. One has my sewing machine and serger on it. the other is right next to it, but raised up to its maximum height (the one with the A-legs because they can be raised up higher) and I use it for cutting/staging my projects.

    I have this- http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/20275885/ on it’s side in the closet and that is where my fabric is stored. My space is pretty new- late summer- so I am still working out what works and what doesn’t, but the tables and shelves fall into the “working” category.

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    I just wanted to add in here, going with the higher cutting tables, if possible, go with a higher sewing table, to be able to sew, standing up, if possible. Ideally, it would be nice to have the flexibility to have different heights for sewing. I have been after this for many years, but haven’t found the perfect set up. Now that more office tables are being offered up with height adjustability, it’s becoming more affordable. Unfortunately, most of those tables that are less expensive, are less stable for machine vibrations. However, there are ways around this. If you purchase the adjustable legs, to go to the height needed, you can then make your own table.

    By having the height adjustable, you can serve several different purposes. Obviously, if you are the only one in the house using the table, you can raise and lower the table to whatever height you need for that time on that day, moving as needed for long periods of sewing time. If you have more than one person, such as small people learning to sew, you can adjust the height for them when they sew and you can still use it for when you sew.

    Taking strain off the shoulders and back, while sewing, really is important, especially if you sew lots. πŸ™‚

    How high is high enough? That’s the magical question. For sewing, not cutting, you could need a table height much, much higher than you thought. πŸ™‚ I just discovered I need a table more around the 48″ -52″ high. I suspect we will see more changes in sewing height recommendations in the near future. Sewing standing up is really wonderful, if you have never tried it. πŸ™‚ You can always have an adjustable chair to go with your adjustable table, so you can partially sit in a higher position, if need be.

    For the record, I have a very small sewing space/room, so I have to be very flexible with my furniture. Anything with locking wheels on it, is my preferred option. πŸ™‚

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I imaging if you’re sewing standing up then the table would need to be at least elbow height or higher!

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 80 total)

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