Oliver + S

Seam finishes

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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    EllenMCM @EllenMCM

    It’s been a LONG TIME since I did any major sewing, but Harriet needs a dress for Easter and violin recitals. Or maybe just for violin recitals, if I don’t sew fast enough. I ordered the pattern today (I’m an old-fashioned girl, so it’s coming in the mail) and I’m shopping for fabric this afternoon (I’m thinking of a purple cotton-linen blend and an accent fabric with some pink in it). I know a bunch of people have sewed this up, because I’ve seen it looking all cute and precious with its adorable welt pockets all over people’s blogs. But no one has posted a shot of the inside.

    Is this a good project for French seams, or is there an alternative that works better?

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    I serged my seams, but you could definitely do French seams for this one, they’re fairly straight, long seams. I’d bear in mind that cotton-linen might be a little heavier, though, and French seams are bulkier than seams finished separately and pressed open. Have you had a peek at the seam finishing tutorials series? I like browsing them when thinking about a new project to help plan out which to use where.

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    EllenMCM @EllenMCM

    I’ve peeked. I should read more thoroughly.

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Ellen, I have just made it and I am blogging a tute. I can put a photo up if you really want to see the ‘guts’ of it.

    I wouldn’t use French seams unless it was a fine fabric. But I must admit to not being a fan of them unless you do them really well. They can look bulky with a heavier fabric.

    I know we have lots of people that love them and do them well. I think my sewing is a bit more agricultural.

    Let me know!

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    meleliza @meleliza

    I am a huge fan of French seams and use them for all kinds of things most people think won’t work, but if it’s like the linen cotton blends I’m familiar with, I would hesitate. Usually, they’re a bit bulky to lay nicely. I would choose a lighter weight fabric and do French seams or stick with the heavier fabric and line it, maybe even flatline one like this.

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    EllenMCM @EllenMCM

    Nicole, I would LOVE to see the guts! Tutes that show garments inside out are my favorites. I can make anything look good on the outside, but the inside is where it lives or dies.

    The fabric I chose is a 60/40 linen/cotton (or possibly the other way around) shirting. It’s similar to chambray. The color is new to me, but I’ve worked with this substrate before – it frays like crazy.

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I have popped up a quickie Ellen. It will give you an idea on how many seams there are.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/motherof5/13550674673/

    (The blurry bit is a piece of interfacing I put in the wrong spot)

    Not the prettiest inside but it sits jolly well.

    I am working on a full tute, but that will be a day or two yet. If you like ‘guts’ shots, have a peep here. http://www.pinterest.com/fiveandcounting/five-and-counting/

    I used a linen cotton mix with velvet so mine did end up a wee bit bulky.

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    daisygirl78 @daisygirl78

    Your finishing is always so pro, Nicole!

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Awww, thank you!

    (E-hug sent in return)

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    EllenMCM @EllenMCM

    It’s lovely! Are you serging or is that an overcast stitch?

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Thank you!

    Its a semi industrial juki over locker.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Yeah. That’s a lot of awkward seams to finish any other way than serging. I will admit there are one or two patterns I have skipped altogether because I know I wouldn’t be able to finish the insides the way I like. If the fabric frays so much, I think I would likely flat line this style. Actually, I think I would probably choose a different pattern where I can easily use French seams. Fairy tale would make a lovely concert dress. And I like to cut the skirt all in one piece to cut back on seam issues even more. Ooo, a nice black sleeveless Fairy Tale makes me eager for my daughter to start piano! 🙂

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    EllenMCM @EllenMCM

    I do not have a serger. And this pattern is on its way, so I will work it out. It looks like the font yoke could be tricky, but I’m sure I can work it out. And, I can line it if I have to.

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    To each her own, but I sewed for years without even really understanding what a serger was for and I survived just fine. You’ll be fine with the front yoke … You sew the flat top half to the gathered bottom half to make a long piece, then sew the two long sides to it. One short straight seam and two long mostly straight seams. The bit around the pockets is the only slightly complicated bit. Does your machine have one of those faux overlock stitches? I used to use those and while they’re slower they’re actually less thready and less bulky than serged seams.

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    You could always use light-weight, narrow bias strips to finish the inside of any garment. 🙂 Here’s April’s lovely tutorial on how to use bias tape: http://oliverands.com/blog/2010/09/bound-seams.html . Keeping the bias strips light-weight and narrow will greatly reduce the bulk. You can bind edges separately, or together, depending on the construction of the garment.

    Happy Sewing

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)

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