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Question about walking foot

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    Profile photo of shokomooshokomoo @shokomoo

    So, I am going to sew my first school days coat for my daughter, and after reading Liesl’s blog about her beautiful school days coat that she made for her daughter, I was convinced to get a walking foot for my sewing machine. While I was searching (and researching) online for a walking foot , I came across another optional foot attachment called “acufeed open toe foot” for janome sewing machine. My understanding is that a lot of people use this attachment for quilting and appliqué, but I have read some people say that “acufeed open toe foot” is better and more worth getting it than walking foot to sew a bulk/thick layers of fabric. I would like to get some opinions on this. Thank you!

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    Profile photo of cybele727cybele727 @cybele727

    I have no idea. But this brings up a thought. Blog post please about various common feet. I know there is YouTube and other posts out there, but if you don’t even know what to search for and why, you can’t teach yourself.

    🙂

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I think the Acufeed system is the integrated walking foot in the Horizon, more expensive, Janomes. I am not sure if it available for other machines/brands? What sewing machine do you have? I would recommend getting the walking foot that is made for your specific machine if possible. I had what I thought was a not so great walking foot but then I used it on a different machine, one it would have been designed for, and it worked beautifully. I am looking forward to getting and using a walking foot with my new Bernina!

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    Profile photo of Liesl GibsonLiesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    This is a great idea for a series of blog posts! I’ll add it to my list. And given that my list is ridiculously long at present, I’ll also put it out there: if anyone would like to tackle this topic I would LOVE to invite you to do it! April did a terrific series of posts a few years ago about seam finishes, one per post, demonstrating and describing. I’d like to do the same thing with sewing machine feet, one foot per post. We could include the posts in our Tutorials section, too. April’s posts have been very popular if you haven’t seen them yet: they’re also in the Tutorials section. Let me know if you’re interested in contributing, anyone!

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    Profile photo of cybele727cybele727 @cybele727

    OOH yes. Someone do that! 🙂

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    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    Ooh, can we please ask Nele to do her invisible zipper foot demo? I wangled my way through the Dutch (I think?) original with the help of web translators but doubt I could explain it to somebody else myself.

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    Profile photo of gailanncreatesgailanncreates @gailanncreates

    The open-toe use is to give the needle room to swing back and forth over the edge of the fabric; hence applique work. It gives you clear visibility, and due to being open, does not push those edges around. Many applique techniques also use a glue or bonding agent before sewing, eliminating pins. If you are doing straight stitching, the open toe does not give much hold on the fabrics used, for the very same reason; there is not much real ‘foot’ to hold the fabrics in place. So there could be a difference, especially in thicker, denser fabrics that might push around. Both feet are great, but you might get different results.

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    What a great idea. I have so many fancy feet but I never seem to find the time to ‘play’ with them.

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    Liesl, I’d be interested in doing some info on feet over my summer (jan/feb). Once the Christmas sewing is done 🙂

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    Profile photo of shokomooshokomoo @shokomoo

    Dear all,

    Thank you all very much for supportive and useful information.

    I am glad that my question sparked a great idea for a series of blog posts–I am sure many people will find it very useful to read.

    After reading all comments, I think I am going to settle to purchase a walking foot for my janome, and get busy sewing the coat, otherwise the winter will be over before I know it!!!

    Thank you all again. Happy sewing from Japan!

    Shoko

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    Profile photo of roundtheworldgirlroundtheworldgirl @roundtheworldgirl

    I will be eagerly awaiting this series. I have a number of feet that came with my (eBay purchase) “vintage” sewing machine and I have no idea what most of them do.

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    Profile photo of pippipippi @pippi
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    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    Yes you are right, traditionally the walking foot is used for quilting but you would use an ordinary open toed foot for applique. The Janome Horizon was the top of the range machine when it was released some three or four years ago and the acufeed feet was its innovative feature. This meant that you could use the acufeed feet with fabrics and layers and keep them together instead of having them slide everywhere. They are exclusive to the Janome Horizon models and you can get three different types (one that looks like your normal foot, the open toe and the edge stitching) how I know this is because I am fortunate to own one of the original 7700’s, the model of which os now discontinued to make way for the newer ones. They are terrific and it means you don’t have to attach a separate walking foot and just do straight stitch.

    If you own a different model of machine or brand then a walking foot will do a great job still. Its just that with these feet you can not be limited with your stitches and methods – and you can top stitch on slippery fabric if you want to.

    A post about machine feet would be ideal Heidi. Do let me know if you want photos of my “feet” and I will be happy to send them to you. It would be great to share ideas and insight on what to use when and how. But not only that, the new tricks because you can use feet for things other than their regular use. The most amazing little gadgets.

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    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    Come to think it I think Pfaff have a similar feature – I remember looking at one of them when shopping around for a machine last time. They have this dinky little way of lifting the foot every time you stop which would be handy for tight little corners and curves etc.

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    Tamara, when I get organised some pictures of your feet would be great. I been thinking I can get hold of a Bernina, a few different short shank machines and maybe a Singer slant, but I don’t think I have access to any of the new type of feet and features like the Horizon. And yes Pfaff have what they call “integrated duel feed” (IDT) I tried out a couple when I was looking for my new machine.

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