Oliver + S

Pants sit low

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
  • LINK
    Profile photo of mrskanucklesmrskanuckles @mrskanuckles

    My daughter wears all pants and shorts very low under her belly. Almost all pants are made for them to sit much higher up. Because she wears them like this, most pants have a saggy crotch area. I made the sailboat this weekend, and they fit nice around the waist and fanny, but there is extra fabric in the crotch. Can I just skoop some of tthe extra out of the pattern or do I try to raise the crotch?

    I cant take much off the top, because then her crack will show in the back.

    I dont have a photo of them yet.

    LINK
    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    I am not sure what you mean by ‘fanny'(that is slang here for vagina) do you mean bottom?

    If they are too baggy at the front pinching a few inches from the front may help….

    Try it on the ones you have made.

    I will have a look at Tilly’s. I think I sized down.

    LINK
    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    Just had a look at Tildy’s and I think if you take the excess from the front where the top of the leg curves and then taper it to meet the side seams that may work best.

    So, not from the top, from the crotch seam. Does that make any sense?

    LINK
    Profile photo of mrskanucklesmrskanuckles @mrskanuckles

    That cracks me up. Fanny is butt…. not alot of people use it, but it makes me laugh.. so I use it alot.

    I dont think I can size down, because the fit around where she wears it is perfect.

    I was thinking because of how they are constructed, I should just sew a much bigger seam allowance on the inseam area of the crotch, so it raises up the crotch?

    LINK
    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    I think that is what I mean too….sorry, its getting late here.

    So butt like bum? Is that why you guys call ‘bum bags’ ‘fanny packs’? Zara had one pinned on her Pinterest board and a friend (from the US) called it a ‘fanny pack’ and she was mortified!

    LINK
    Profile photo of mrskanucklesmrskanuckles @mrskanuckles

    Yes! But fanny packs are usually super uncool and touristy. Unless of course I missed the memo that they are making a comeback.

    Thanks, I will try altering these pants a bit to see if I can get that crotch looking less saggy.

    LINK
    Profile photo of sayiamyousayiamyou @maraya

    Poor Z. Fanny pack is a pouch that is usually worn around the waist. I’ve never heard anything negative or offensive associated with them.

    LINK
    Profile photo of mrskanucklesmrskanuckles @mrskanuckles

    🙁 Sorry.. I shouldnt have said they were uncool… but wikipedia pretty much sums it up.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fanny_pack

    LINK
    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    I’m guessing we’re talking about two different things … A kind of saggy black polyester sack worn with tall white socks and hiking sandals, versus some kind of Lara croft style holster-like number.

    LINK
    Profile photo of cybele727cybele727 @cybele727

    I have not a thing to add, except to say, this is my best laugh in days! 🙂

    LINK
    Profile photo of melelizameleliza @meleliza

    Oh dear, here we go again! My best friend from college spent a year abroad in England and got herself in so much trouble with an elderly sale woman at a nice store when she went in looking for a “fanny pack.” The poor woman couldn’t believe her ears that such an offensive word wouod be uttereted so loudly. Lol.

    Fanny is an old fashioned word for the gluteal muscles. It’s very benign and inoffensive in America. Something a grandmother would say. Younger people say “butt.” However, in Englad – and I suppose in AUS too – it is in fact an offensive word. So yes, those unattractive tourist pouches that buckle around the waist are known as “fanny packs” where in England they’re called “bum bags.” probably everyone knows that “bum” is British for gluteals? From the Australian soap operas I used to watch when I lived in England, I suspect Australian vocabulary is closer to Brisith than American.

    I find it highly amusing that such a silly little word is found offensive by Brits when they throw around the C word as if it’s “cookie.”

    LINK
    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    You mean a biscuit Melanie.

    (He he)

    And anyone throwing the ‘C’ word in my house would get a teaspoon of chilli for their trouble.

    LINK
    Profile photo of mrskanucklesmrskanuckles @mrskanuckles

    I’m going to have to keep this in mind if I travel because I would be offending people all over the place….

    I use fanny daily to my kids (because it is so cute,endearing,and used little)

    I’m gonna pinch that fanny….

    Move your fanny out of the way….

    Put some clothes on..no one wants to see your fanny…..

    I may get thrown in jail.

    LINK
    Profile photo of melelizameleliza @meleliza

    Well, I suppose it was mostly the young lads who threw the C word around and not respectable family people. Oh, and they would call women “cow” all the time. I found both of those so offensive at first! But it’s amazing how quickly you get used to it. I came home from a year in London with such a potty-mouth!

    Speaking of which, “potty” is another of those words some Brits find offensive. We were last in England with a potty training toddler so it was a big subject of discussion. Americans find the word “potty” a little softer and less hard than the word toilet, but the English family we were with was sort of shocked to hear me use it all the time. They actually prefer toilet or, obviously, loo. Ah, two great countries…

    LINK
    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    Three, separated by a barely common language, indeed. I suppose we can add Singapore to the list as well, lah.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

copyright

Unless otherwise credited, all work on this blog is © Liesl + Co., Inc, 2008-2016. You are welcome to link to this blog, but please ask permission before using any text or images.