Oliver + S

Fairy Tale Sizing of Bodice? HELP!

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 55 total)
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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    We really could do with Liesl doing some troubleshooting fit problems for children/toddlers. Although there seems to be lots on ladies fit issues and corrections I have seen/read very little on childrens!

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Ok, we’re going to work on a blog post about making a muslin. I hope to do it early next week, and we’ll include some information about how t make a muslin, some tips that will help with fitting, and a few simple and common alterations you might need to make. But in the meantime, here are a few tips for Mommy2maria, based on the photo:

    1. The muslin is looking too wide around, so I’d suggest going back down to the chest measurement and working up from there. We can adjust for the belly, but it’s much harder to adjust for the chest and armholes, so start with the size that fits the upper torso best.

    2. When you cut out your muslin, leave extra fabric at the side seams. Then when you fit the bodice you can let out at the sides as necessary to accommodate the belly.

    3. When you cut out the muslin, be sure to mark the seam line for the neck, armholes, and waist. This will help with the fitting, too. This bodice is looking very long (it might be the camera angle?), and that’s going to throw off the fit, too. You’ll want this waist to sit high on her, like at the natural waist (not where she wears her jeans). Can you also show us a side angle? It’s a little hard to get a read from this photo.

    I’ll get on this as soon as I can so we can show you in photos on the blog. And if you’re looking for additional information about fit, you can apply a lot of the same information about adult fitting to children’s clothing. But with kids you don’t need to deal with the bust, so it’s still a little simpler than women’s apparel. Don’t worry–we’ll get this working for you.

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    Jess M. @mommy2maria

    Liesl,

    Let me get some pictures and I’ll post them this afternoon and explain more about our issue.

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    cybele727 @cybele727

    Liesl,

    My local small fabric shop owner asked me why I like your patterns so much. She said in an almost derogatory tone, “it is like a little cult following.” I said, “Well, where else can you get advice when you need help from people who are or have worked on the exact same thing? Plus when we are all stuck, where else does the designer hop on and say, “hey, let’s work this out together!”? Almost no one stands behind their products anymore, let alone helps their customer grow with the company!

    So your post… these are the reasons why *I* love Oliver and S. Not only are you selling a product, you want me and everyone who uses it to have a wonderful experience and grow as sew-ist etc.

    Sew (pun intended)….thanks! 🙂

    Jenny

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Aw, thanks Jenny! Glad to hear that. I’m here to help you learn to sew, and I’m glad that I can do that! I think of our patterns as an experience rather than a product, so it’s nice to know that you like that about them.

    xo,

    Liesl

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    Jennifer1568 @Jennifer1568

    I am so glad you are going to do a blog post about fitting a muslin. I was getting intimidated. I think I’ll be able to apply the knowledge to other fit issues as well. The information about fitting to the chest measurement and then adding extra fabric to side seams and letting the waist sit at the waist is reassuring. I didn’t know that. I am totally inexperienced when it comes to fitting a bodice. I, too, love your patterns. You are exactly right about it being an experience. I have totally enjoyed the Book Report Dress and the Field Trip experience and want to repeat them.

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    Wow Liesl, what a prompt reply. I agree with Jenny, I really appreciate help from the community and and you. If someone talks to me about learning to sew I send them straight to your patterns.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    I agree with the above advice to make a muslin and maybe skip the darts. But I wanted to add that a Muslim of the bodice takes only a few minutes to mock up. I am sewing this for a 5 year old and instead of relying on measurements alone, I made a bodice in both the 5 and 6 to try on. I included zippers and it still took under a half hour. Totally worthwhile.

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    cybele727 @cybele727

    I am absolutely going to make the muslim bodice. But my problem was which size to even cut to start with b/c of such a wide range between the shoulders and the belly! I look forward to the blog, so I can be a touch more confident with the sizing and adjustment issues.

    I am being more careful b/c I found the MOST STUNNING peacock blue dupioni silk, and I plan on making this for Thanksgiving, Christmas and her birthday. So I am guaranteed 3 wears out of the super fancy dress!

    I also plan on doing less fancy versions, perhaps sans lining and tulle. But considering the cost of dupioni, even on sale, I totally want to get this right!! 🙂

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    cybele727 @cybele727

    Ok i have another question. In making view A, on the package there are contrasting colors for the collar and waist. On the pattern, piece 10 is cut on the bias grain. Is that to fit it on the yardage, or is it for ease ? I ask because if I want a contrasting color (dupioni silk), I would need a goodly amount to accomodate the bias, but if I can cut it crosswise with the width of the fabric, I would only need like an 1/8 or 1/4 yard for the collar and waist?

    Any opinions?

    Jenny

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    meleliza @meleliza

    I don’t have a specifc answer, but in general the yardage in these patterns is generous. For a special fabric, I would trace and lay out the pieces first to determine just exactly how much is needed.

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    Jess M. @mommy2maria

    Ok, here are the best pics I could get. I went ahead and made a size 4 and this is using the 4.

    Here is my issue:

    We have a much different issue than your average child buddha belly 🙂 M has a very large abdominal defect and starts protruding at the xyphoid process (you know, that lower center part of your rib cage) so she basically looks like she has a little pregnant belly—and it is exactly at her “natural waist” (we are hoping to have surgery next summer! *fingers crossed*). I’ve been making 3-4T O+s and adding length because her belly needs extra length. So that also throws off where she wears her pants (they sit on her hip–just like her yellow diaper in the pic below–that’s typically where her pants fit–high in the back, lowww in the font LOL)

    So, when I fit the size 4 muslin, it is much shorter than the previous picture, and does get a better fit at the belly, but it rises at the neck at every slight movement. Every time she lifts her arms above her shoulder, the whole thing rides up and sits on top of her stomach, yet is much longer in the back.

    Here is the pictures of the bodice:

    Front:

    http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb181/jmaatta/DSC06356.jpg

    Side: seeing this, there is a lot of room at the armpit.

    http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb181/jmaatta/DSC06358.jpg

    Here is a pic that shows the difference between chest and belly from the side:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jmaatta/6844021281/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jmaatta/6878778187/

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    Jess M. @mommy2maria

    Also, want to say that I’m agreeing with Jenny—the customer service that accompanies these patterns is impeccable! Not to mention the community here! Everyone welcomes new people, and helps each other out!

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    catherinel @catherinel

    Mommy2maria,

    Thanks for posting your fitting problems, and thank you Liesl for your wonderful responses to everybody’s questions.

    In looking at your little cutie’s special fitting issues, it seems to me that the pivot method of alterations might work the best for you. My 17-year-old has a very broad back (across the shoulder blades) and slim arms, torso and hips. When she was little I couldn’t just size up for a bodice dress because then the shoulder seam was too long and the armholes were too big. I had a basic square yoke pattern that I made just for her using the pivot method. This way the shoulder seams were the same length and the armholes were the same circumference; just the back was broader.

    You might try it for just the front piece on the pattern to get a good fit across the tummy. It would make the front somewhat a-lined, but as long as the front and back side seams were still the same length I think it would work. It would also make that side seam hang straight instead of getting pulled to the front.

    Just a thought from someone who loved geometry (I know I’m a freak).

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Yeah, I think catherine is onto something. I have been procrastinating because it seems like a lot of hassle but eventually what I want to do for myself is make a basic ‘blank’ that I know will fit me well and is closely-fitted (and it will be easy to work out from there for something more loose fitting) because my measurements are all over the place. Have you tried doing a draping technique to get that basic shape for your daughter? It might be easier to start that way, than to make multiple pivot adjustments. I haven’t tried it myself — anybody else tried draping?

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 55 total)

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