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Why did I wait so long to get a serger???

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    Profile photo of paulapaula @paula

    I am in love. I FINALLY broke down and bought a cheap serger off of Amazon.com and I don’t know why I waited so long!!! I thought I should save money and buy an expensive serger/ coverstitch, but after having so much of my hard work get ruined due to inadequate seam finishing I cracked! Hahaha!

    I just finished Amy Alan’s beginner serging on Craftsy and now I am a serging fanatic! I’ve made more projects these past few days and I don’t want to stop. 🙂

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    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    Hi Paula

    That is fantastic! Yes overlockers/ sergers are really a great machine to have when garment sewing. I bet you have learned all there is to know on the craftsy class too.

    Tamara

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    Profile photo of PreemieMommaPreemieMomma @PreemieMomma

    This is just how I felt when I got my serger a year and a half ago. I don’t know how I ever got along without one. I have precious little time to sew so being able to finish seams with a serger really helps me create things more quickly than I ever could without it!

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    Profile photo of MaggieMaggie @Maggie

    I got a cheap one too and have been very happy. Did you like the Craftsy class? I’ve thought about it, but I can sew knits and finish seams just fine with no class. (Hey, I have class! Oh, you know what I mean.)

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    A basic overlocker works very well it was what I asked for the first year I started sewing again for Christmas! Now four years later I am thinking of adding a stand alone coverstitch.

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    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    Yes cover stitch machine are handy too, especially if you do a lot of knits but they can be used for wovens as well. I purchased one last year. I know that some women have cover stitch included in there overlocker/ sergers but find it a pain to keep swapping over. A separate one it ideal as then if one goes bung you have the other to use.

    Maggie we know you have class! Nice to have a giggle.

    Craftsy classes are great but I advice watching for the particular ones you like to be on sale – savings savings savings!

    Tamara

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    Profile photo of jaimielaurajaimielaura @jaimielaura

    Ladies,

    Please let me know what coverstitch machine you recommend. I would like to purchase one. Thanks!

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    I am a fan of older model semi-industrial machines.

    Initially, the cost may be a little higher but one services them one self as there is very little to go wrong on them.

    I am looking at this model. http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Industrail-pegasus-cover-stitch-sewing-mechine-/200956510544?pt=AU_Sewing&hash=item2ec9f10150&_uhb=1 but I need to rear a few steers to pay for it.

    At present I have an Elna overlocker/cover stitch set up purely as a cover stitch (which is a wicked waste) but they do make a stand alone cover stitch machine.

    The question is, how much knit sewing to you do? Its a lot of money (think $1000 new) if you only make a handful of knit items a year.

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    Profile photo of rastisrastis @rastis

    love my overlocker! i debated it for ages, but never regretted buying it about 6 years ago… they are so useful

    and yes nicole i lust after the semi industrials!! love machines with grunt and speed! i’d need to convert our shed though to have room for them though!

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    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    Same here — waited and waited, debated and debated. Finally the one I wanted went on sale after close to a year of looking for deals or used machine. I love it and just wish I actually had time to sew right now!

    What kinds of things did the Craftsy class cover? I’m sure these machine can be used in ways I haven’t even thought of.

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    Profile photo of paulapaula @paula

    The class was perfect for me. I was very intimidated by the dreaded threading, tension problems, etc. and actually afraid to use the machine! It covers everything from how to get started, parts of the machine, troubleshooting different stitches (4 and 3 thread overlock, 3 thread flatlock, 3 thread narrow seam, 3 thread rolled hem, 2 thread overlock, and 2 thread rolled hem. She also covers using different decorative stitches and using yarn, silk ribbon, thick rayon, wooly nylon, and pearl cotton. You complete 3 easy projects a zipper bag, ruffled apron, and knit scarf. The bonus section is on using a gathering foot, elasticator, and blind hem foot.

    I am no longer afraid to use the serger and threading was a breeze!

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    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    I picked the machine I did specifically because the threading and tension are all but automatic. I didn’t even look at the manual, just took it out of the box and threaded it following a little diagram printed on the inside. But all that other stuff would be great to know, especially the rolled hems and all the extra feet.

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