Oliver + S

View buttonhole dilemma– help!

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    Profile photo of purlknitpurlpurlknitpurl @purlknitpurl

    Happy Mother’s Day! Ok, making this jacket for my son out of beautiful Italian wool. Realized, however, that my bernina 330 b will not allow me to sew buttonholes ( too thick to feed through feed dogs ). Question for those who have made this beautiful jacket: can I put Velcro or snaps on three button tabs and then sew button on the other tabs so I am essentially creating a faux buttonhole . Recommendations on which would look most realistic? Does this make sense! Best, purl

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    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    How about handmade buttonholes? If you don’t want working buttonholes, your choice of fastener on the underside of a tab should be fine. Since it won’t show from the front, I don’t think it makes a difference which you choose. Magnetic snaps might be nice, too, like Juliamom did. I would avoid Velcro since the scratchy side seems to snag on wool (for me). Good luck, look forward to seeing it!

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    Profile photo of purlknitpurlpurlknitpurl @purlknitpurl

    Thanks for those suggestions, Sarvi. And good point about velcro– that will drive me nuts! Quick question, since I have not seen magnetic snaps in action. How do you attach to the tabs– do you sew them inside the button tab? Is there a certain brand I should buy? I’ll look up what Juliamom did so I can maybe see some pictures.

    Thanks for your advice!!

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    Magnetic snaps would be perfect.

    I also use over size metal press-studs (poppers) which I hand sew in.

    Then I add my buttons as a purely decorative finish.

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    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    Ah, yes, I think those are what I meant when I said snaps, sorry, I’m a bit fuzzy on the nomenclature.

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