Oliver + S

Totally Random Sewing Question

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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    LAPLibrarian @LAPLibrarian

    So, I’m about to start a lazy days skirt (loved the beautiful options showed on the blog!) and changed the needle on my sewing machine. And that’s when I wondered, “what does everyone do with his/her sewing needles when it’s time to discard them?”

    Aside from a “sharps bin” does anyone have some brilliant way to prevent accidental pinpricks? I ended up wadding a piece of paper towel and sticking it in the middle, but I figured there was probably a better idea out there from more seasoned sewing individuals! Thanks!

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    sayiamyou @maraya

    I wrap mine like you, but I noticed a wooden bin just yesterday in my local sewing shop.

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    mrsc1345 @mrsc1345

    I used to just toss them and hope for the best, but now I stuck them in a mason jar with my sewing supplies. If I ever want to toss them out they are safe and contained, but I kinda like watching them pile up in the jar, a tangible way to gauge my sewing, I suppose.

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Oh,I am bad!

    I toss them in my scrap bin-Hugo beware!(he empties the bins)!

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    I also just stick mine in the trash, probably not wise, but like the mason jar idea. I read somebody suggest using an old pill bottle.

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    Nicole @motherof5

    The pill bottle is a great idea,the child safe cap would stop fiddly fingers.

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    Robin @Robin

    I’m going to ask the pharmacist if they’ll take my “sharps”. They do take syringes. At the moment my used rotary blades, needles and pins are in a jar.

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    icicle @icicle

    I just pin mine into a scrap of fabric or paper, mostly so it doesn’t fall out of my wicker trash basket (whereupon I’d then surely step on it), and toss it in the bin. But then, I don’t change them NEARLY as often as I should… 😉

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    JenniferP @JenniferP

    Great ideas for disposal, but how do you know when you need to change your needle?

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    Nicole @motherof5

    That can be a moot point Jennifer.

    I am pretty fussy and change mine every 12 sewing hours(If I have not broken it by then). I definitely can feel the needle get a little rough and my stitching gets a bit funky when the needle is getting a bit blunt.

    That said,my machine is semi-industrial and quite fast so I do hit a few pins.

    My mother rarely changed her needles and teasers me mercifully for being so anal about it.

    ~Nicole~

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    sayiamyou @maraya

    I probably change my needles every other project. That is, of course, if the projects were the same (meaning, both shirts from lightweight fabrics for instance). Now I’m working with wool so I changed to a heavier needle for the project and I’ll toss it when I’m finished because I know it’ll need it. Get a good look at a brand new needle and then keep an eye on it (and the stitching on your project). You’ll know when it needs to be changed.

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    Tamara @justsewit

    I change needles about every 8 hours but I am down to my final one for wovens so the one I have in at the moment (even thoug it was the culprit that broke that button) has to stay in for a bit longer. As for disposing, the used ones go in the bin with the bits of fabric that aren’t useable anymore and not once have we come a cropper with them so I guess it has proven to be a worthy disposal method. I have to wait till tomorrow to get the new ones that will be waiting at the post office (no posties out here) .I generally know it’s time to change when I hear a popping sound from the needle going through the fabric – telltale sign that the needle is well and truly blunt.

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    Emily @Emily

    I use an (empty and washed) long necked soda or beer bottle. The bottom is usually heavy enough to prevent it from tipping over, and if it does get knocked over the long neck and narrow opening prevents all the sharps from spilling out. Bent pins and sewing needles fit in nicely, and it takes FOREVER to fill it up (at which point I toss it in the recycle), and it was free.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)

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