Oliver + S

Sizing dilemma

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    Profile photo of sarsouroursarsourour @kookiblah

    So here’s the deal. My daughter is just about 3.5 and I’ve been making her size 4. She isn’t very tall (38″) but she’s solid (not big, just not a rail). Size 4 tends to be a tad big (usually) but I’m fine with that as it will fit her for more than a minute. My problem is there a bunch of patterns I want to buy, but I don’t know whether to move up to the bigger size range or to buy the smaller one. Is it easy enough to size down from the 5? I’m not good at modifying patterns, but I also want to make sure she can wear it before a year from now. Any advice??

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    Good question, different patterns do fit differently according to body shape as well as size.

    I hope some others can chime in too 🙂

    Family Reunion, generous fit, make the chest measurement. (Smaller size range)

    Music Class Shirt skirt, standard fit, safely make a size up. (Larger size)

    Sketchbook Shirt/ shorts standard fit width but add some length if you want to tuck.

    Jumprope, very forgiving, size up.

    Playtime tunic, standard size.

    Trixie needs a feed so I must dash but I will come back and add a few more as they come to me.

    Anyone else?

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    Profile photo of mcholley1mcholley1 @mcholley1

    I remember buying the picnic blouse in the five when my daughter was between sizes and just folding a pinch out of the center fronts and back.

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    Profile photo of sarsouroursarsourour @kookiblah

    Here are the ones on my list at the moment:

    School bus t-shirt

    Nature walk yoga pants

    family reunion dress

    class picnic blouse and shorts

    playtime tunic and leggings

    I own about 20 others that I will eventually have to replace with the bigger size ranges. Part of me thinks I should get the bigger ones because chances are I won’t get to all of them before she’s grown, but then part of me also wants to be able to make them for her now. Argh!!

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    Bigger size for Nature Walk definitely.

    Will you purchase paper or PDF? If its the latter, don’t buy until you want to sew. If you already have a lot, buy the bigger size or delay purchasing.

    (Say’s me that had both sizes of them all)!

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I second the larger size nature walk pants, I’d also be inclined to buy the playtime leggings in the larger size. I’ll be honest I’m another one who has most of my patterns in both sizes 🙂

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    Profile photo of kgiffkgiff @kgiff

    I’m right there with you. I have a daughter just in size 4, but I’m having a hard time buying patterns for just one size. I’ve been buying the larger size for most. I do have the family reunion in both sizes now after advice from the lovely ladies here.

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    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    I’m in the same boat as Nicole — at some point I will try to collect the whole shebang in paper to hand down to my daughter (or possibly a grandchild if that seems like a better option). There’s something very satisfying about the object-ness of the paper patterns.

    If you’re just buying to sew, you could buy the pattern along with the fabric and notions when it’s time to actually make the project. Kind of like not buying ingredients until you’re ready to cook so high hopes don’t fall prey to a busy life and turn into wasted food (sigh, something that still happens to me despite my best intentions).

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    Profile photo of needlewomanneedlewoman @needlewoman

    The Icecream dress, and the Book Report dress are both generous patterns around the chest and waist, and very easy to lengthen or shorten because they are divided into sections c/o design. I’m biased because these are two of my favourites. The Music box pinafore is a joy to sew, and nicely roomy around the chest without swimming.

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