Oliver + S

sheer fabrics finishes for fairy tale

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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    meleliza @meleliza

    So last night as I was just about to fall asleep, it hit me that I’m about to sew the Fairy Tale dress in cotton organdy. Organdy is sheer. I’m going to have to do something about the seam allowances and zipper! I know there’s more than one way to tackle this and I would really appreciate any feedback. How can I make the seam allowances neat and tidy but still maintain the floaty quality of the organdy?

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    Nicole @motherof5

    It sounds delightful Melanie.

    I think I would consider underlining the bodice like I did with the spotty tulle on Zara’s Fairy Tale dress http://fiveandcounting-motherof5.blogspot.com.au/2013/01/a-christmas-fairy-tale-tutorial-part-i.html?showComment=1358649417151 and making the skirt with french seams or cut the skirt in one piece.

    My method may be a bit industrial compared to your beautiful heirloom sewing techniques but it may give you a few ideas?

    ~Nicole~

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Well to keep it in the heirloom frame of mind, French seams are a must for the skirt. And I second Nicole’s suggestion about the lining it’ll make it a little easier and less see through on the bodice.

    Do you still want to see the pin tuck idea or are you not doing that now?

    Tamara

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    meleliza @meleliza

    I think you’re right, Nicole, underlining is probably the best way for the bodice. The organdy skirt will be cut from one piece. It just fits with the size 8. The lining will have French seams.

    What about the zipper? I am planning a hand picked zip so I can be absolutely certain there will be no mishaps.

    Tamara, I am thinking of a series of 3 or 5 pin tucks with an embroidered insertion above and below. Maybe wider tucks above and below that. If I can get it right, I will secure them with a hem or feather stitch. I am undecided whether to add tucks to the bodice too, or leave it simple for a more modern take on heirloom.

    There will be a full sash in satin. For the sleeves, I *think* I will do a baby hem and try a hemstitch over that. But I change my mind daily. The little girl likes the tulip sleeve. But I think I might rather a regular sleeve with them hem bound in tiny bias.

    I’m not really looking to follow heirloom guidelines too strictly, I just think that some of that style detail is the right thing for the occasion.

    Thanks ladies, for your help!

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    I’m interested in trying this out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=MZMllBR9OVs

    I found I actually did not like French seams for certain things, they can get a little bulky. I haven’t done it though — if you try it, post a pic!

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    Tamara @justsewit

    If you have a wide sash then there wouldn’t be a need to add tucks to the bodice. I think a modern take on heirloom would be outstanding. And the tucks on the skirt with embroidery is what I would do too. I haven’t worked with Organdy so it may behave differently. The criss cross effect is very time consuming so you are better off going for a more simple tuck than that I think. It sounds gorgeous! Can’t wait to see.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Sarvi, thanks for that link! That is seriously awesome. I use a baby hem all the time, so I get it. If I don’t try it on this, I will for my next selfish blouse. It looks like a very high end finish to me.

    Tamara, thanks for the feedback. My fabric is already on its way! Once I have it in hand I hope to be able to make final decisions. Organdy is new to me too, but my mother remembers it from her childhood. my grandmother made all their party dresses from it in the 50s and 60s but it’s hard to find now. heirloom stuff is only found in the South really. I guess it’s the old fashioned tastes and hot humid climate that keeps it alive down there. I am practicing my machine hemstitch to see if it’s workable.

    Nicole, I’ve been looking at Zara’s dress too and it is so chic and sophisticated. It’s really perfect for her.

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    Tamara @justsewit

    I know Farmhouse fabrics is my go to place for heirloom stuff. I love that there is a spot that reveres this way of dressing for special occasions – think I should have hailed from there instead of down under! Some of it can be very frilly though but mostly it is divine to look at and make.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Yes, I got it all from Farmhouse Fabrics. They were very helpful on the phone, though I wish some of their online descriptions were a little more specific. Also, they have so much stuff it’s hard to wade through!

    I ordered samples of silk/satin for the sash from another place, which should arrive soon. Come to think of it, this place is in California, so maybe a good place for you in Oz? It’s Harts Fabric in Santa Cruz. Lots of good apparel stuff, not heirloom.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    So what about the collar? Wouldn’t it be sweet in organdy? But what about the seam allowances? I have Googled sheer collars and checks a few forums, but haven’t found a solution.

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I would interface with a very good quality soft interfacing but trim the seam allowances from it(the interfacing).

    Hopefully that would help reduce a dark border around the edge of the collar.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Maybe use the cotton lawn as an underlining for the collar too?

    Or, is there any rule that collars have to be two layers? What if it was a single layer like the sleeves and edge finished the same way somehow? Though the curves are an issue.

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    NanaMar @NanaMar

    I have two suggestions for the collar:

    one – sew the collar, using a fine stitch length; sew again very close to the seamline and then trim very close to the second stitching line; turn and finger press. You will be able to see the seam but it will be very small and neat. A row of fine whipstitching along the edge in silk or cotton floss would disguise the seam.

    or, two – bind the collar with narrow organdy bias, remembering to reduce the collar by its seam allowance; this requires hand basting the bias on so that it is perfect before careful machine stitching; you might want to shape your bias to the collar shape with an iron before basting.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Thank you for those suggestions! I really like the bias idea.

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Sarvi, thanks for the youtube link, I tried out some Gretchen style hairline seams on a semi-sheer pull on parka that I’m making where I knew some of the seams would be visible and didn’t like the idea of zigzag finishing them. Worked a treat, and there were plenty of curvy curves to get around. Will post some seam pictures when I’m finished.

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