Oliver + S

Sew in interfacing for the Tea Party?

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    sidewalkgoddess @sidewalkgoddess

    Hello, I am pretty new to garment sewing and I hope this is not a stupid question…

    I have used iron on interfacing to make a bag in my sewing class, and while I had no issues using it, it made me ill (I have MCS) so I would like to avoid using it for my girls. I know sew in interfacing can be used, but I am nervous because with the exception of adding length I have never deviated from a pattern before. I was just wondering if anyone else has done it with this pattern (or at all in clothing really) and if there is anything I should look out for. Roc commendations for what to use for sew in interfacing would also be appreciated (I am making the dresses in quilting cotton)

    Thanks in advance!

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    Someone recommended using fabric as a replacement for the interfacing, so on my last one that I used a satiny fabric for the lining I also cut out and sewed in some of it instead of the interfacing. I cut it the same length as the interfacing piece reccommended but made it the same shape as the top of the pattern, basted it to the lining and then sewed it into the seam and trimmed the seam allowance as normal. I imagine a piece of muslin or quilting cotton could be used as it’s just giving extra strength for the buttons and button holes.

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    Here’s the link, the comment about self fabric is about half way down by meleliza https://oliverands.com/forums/topic.php?id=2261

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Have you tried washing the interfacing in your sensitive wash or does the heated bonding glue make you unwell?

    You could use any light weight pre-shrunk fabric as interfacing,it just requires a little more effort basting it in place.

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