Oliver + S

Scratchy piping

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    Profile photo of RhythmRhythm @rhythmtyagi

    Hello there! This is quite random but I don’t know of any other forum that could give me some advice.
    I made a blouse for myself and wanted to add piping on the neckline for detailing. The blouse is unlined. After a bit of searching around I decided to use the piping as the neck facing -http://www.blogforbettersewing.com/2014/02/tutorial-using-piping-as-facing.html

    It sounded brilliant. I went ahead and finished the entire blouse. Now the issue is that I used store bought piping and applied as facing , it is really scratchy. Is there some solution I could use?

    Profile photo of nzsewistnzsewist @Ann-Maree

    I have been almost exactly where you are. I used pre-made binding as the armhole facing for an unlined dress for myself once and it was so scratchy and uncomfortable that I couldn’t wear it.

    Could you cut some cotton lawn or silk on the bias (or some of the fabric you used for the blouse) and hand stitch it to the seam allowances of the piping? I guess that only deals with the allowances though and not the piped edge. Would covering the allowances help to put some distance between your skin and the piped edge though so that it wouldn’t rub?

    Or could you unpick it and re-do it with some home made piping? Sometimes some well placed stay stitching and some starch can hold things in place for you to re-sew, even if you’ve clipped curves etc. already.

    Profile photo of RhythmRhythm @rhythmtyagi

    Thank you so much for the suggestion, I will try binding the piping seam allowance.

    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    Great ideas @ann-maree.

    How frustrating @rhythmtyagi, it may soften yet or you could try giving it a scrub with a nailbrush and some yellow soap. That may help remove the dressing.

    xx Nicole

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