Oliver + S

Question about a newbie making piping

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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    Lex3131 @Lex3131

    Hello all

    I have recently discovered Oliver + S patterns and my mind is already overflowing with the possibilities… I just purchased my first pattern, the tea party dress and I am really inspired by the use of piping, which is something I haven’t done before. I have a smallish piece of some patterned fabric that I would love to have a go with making my own piping for the part where the bodice joins the skirt (and maybe the skirt panels if I have enough) I have looked around and making my own piping seems fairly straightforward (I’m thinking flat to start with)

    Anyways my question is if I am making the piping for these parts does it need to be cut on the bias? I’m not sure I have enough fabric to cut it this way and was wondering if I could cut straight down the width of the fabric. I’m fairly new to sewing, only really started 9 months ago when my daughter was born, so I’m sorry of that’s a pretty stupid question ๐Ÿ™‚

    Thanks in advance for any suggestion

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Not a stupid question at all! For the curved edge of the bodice I think bias cut piping will really make your life a lot easier. It’s a curve that already requires some patience and attention, and I think wrangling piping that doesn’t want to curve will add unnecessary difficulty. Sorry, wish I could tell you to go for it!

    Welcome aboard and please feel free to add a photo to the Flickr group, it’ll be nice to see that pattern around again ๐Ÿ™‚

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    Lex3131 @Lex3131

    Thank you so much for your quick reply. I’ll leave it for now then I was just hoping to make use of the little piece of fabric. ๐Ÿ™‚

    How do you go for making your piping then? Does it take a lot of fabric to cut it on the bias? I really like the look of the plain fabric with the patterned piping, but am thinking it could get expensive to make it that way…

    By the way, it’s so good to have a friendly forum attached to the site. I’m getting lots of ideas and everyone seems so helpful, not so helpful to the bank balance though ๐Ÿ™‚

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    If you don’t mind a few seams in your bias binding you can probably still do it. Often a small piece of fabric ends up producing a LOT of bias binding. Try googling “bias binding tutorial” or “continuious bias binding”, these will give you some help on how to make you binding from a small piece.

    I use the clover bias tape makers, mainly the blue (1″) and red ones (3/4″) but I think the scientific seamstress has a paper bias tape maker on her site.

    Good luck

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Bias piping makes for a better finish.

    I tend to make just what I need. Often after cutting a strip of bias,I find I can cut a bodice or collar from the scraps for another project.

    I use a yard long ruler laid on the bias for inseam piping. For binding I use a slightly wider (souvenir type) ruler as this give me a bit more width for binding seams.

    Good Luck and welcome.

    ~Nicole~

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    Lex3131 @Lex3131

    Thanks for all the help.

    I googled the continuous bias binding and found some great tutorials. I’ve just finished up having a go using an old fat quarter I had laying around. I was surprised by how much it made!

    Thanks Nicole for your suggestion too. I guess it will depend on the pattern I’m making and how I can layout the pieces to see if I can get some bias strips that way as well.

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    I’ve tried using flat piping cut on the grain when I only had a bit for a Music Box jumper and that’s a straight line seam. It still didn’t lie as nicely as if I’d cut it on the bias. So what everyone says is true. However sometimes an angle of about 30degrees rather than true 45deg will give enough “stretch” for it to behave like bias binding. That way you may get a little bit more length….

    I read the piping tutorial too and then wanted to “pipe” everything I saw.

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    highpowermom @highpowermom

    What Lightning said about using a different angle, I used to do that all the time before I learned the right way, LOL (and the 45 does work better if you can do it). My first Tea Party playsuit I used a stripe, so the bias piping had diagonal lines which looked really cool. I’m lazy about piecing bias (plus the seam always seems to wind up in the most visible place!), so I measure the seams I need it for and try to get each in one length.

    I adore flat piping so much, I can’t remember the last time I used corded piping. Flat piping has the look without the bulk. I think the last time I used corded piping it was from a purchased package… yeah, lazy about making my own of that, too!

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    Lex3131 @Lex3131

    I had a go at making my own binding after googling the continuous binding (thanks for the hint). I was surprised how straight forward it was. My husband came home and I showed him my efforts all excited at making my own binding and he just looked at me strangely holding just a long strip of fabric LOL.

    I ended up chickening out on adding the piping as I had never used the pattern before and as you said doing the bodice bit could be tricky (good advice btw). I reckon it would have looked great with the piping but I was still pretty pleased with the results. Thanks for all your help.

    Tea Party Playsuit

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/plentyofpastimes/8487796497/in/pool-oliverands

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    Nicole @motherof5

    It is gorgeous and your bubby is so sweet!

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