Oliver + S

piping

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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    yellow_blue @yellow_blue

    Hello,

    I loved the piping on all the photos that Liesl put up and am inspired to do the same, especially the sandbox pants which I have cut fabric for. I am wondering is there a good tutorial somewhere that will teach me how to do this? I am still fairly a new sewist and anything along those lines would be really useful.

    Thank you all.

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Hi there — I think there are instructions for how to do it on some of the patterns (Tea Party?) — might have a look through your other patterns. Possibly the Popover also has instructions (and is a free download — click on Blog and then check the menu on the right side of the screen, I believe). The basic technique is pretty simple, though — you just catch the raw edge of your piping in a seam (so it would have three layers: fabric right side up, piping, fabric right side down, with all the raw edges facing the same way). You can insert ribbon, lace, or ric-rac the same way. If you want to try it out with a very simple flat piping, just cut a narrow strip of fabric (try somewhere around one inch, depending on your same allowance, and see what width you like the looks of) and fold it in half lengthwise, wrong sides together.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Here’s a tutorial by Colette Patterns: http://www.coletterie.com/tutorials-tips-tricks/tutorial-how-to-make-piping

    I find the trickiest part is lining everything up just right.

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    catherinel @catherinel

    I use piping all the time–usually make it myself. I’ve never done the flat piping, always using what’s usually called baby piping. The piping that you usually find in the major fabric stores is bigger than what I think is pretty on children’s clothing, so I make my own. I haven’t looked at any tutorials, so I’m sorry in advance if I’m repetitive. I make my own using cotton twisted twine as the filler. It is very inexpensive at the hardware store–I bought a ball about 8 years ago that I’m still using. Always, always cut your fabric on the bias to make the piping. I cut strips 1″ wide. This makes a finished baby piping with a seam allowance of about 3/8″ (it takes 1/4″ of the width to wrap around the filler). I also always use a pintuck foot to make and apply the piping, adjusting the needle position as appropriate. Before applying, I trim the piping seam allowance to the same width as the pattern seam allowance. If I have to go around sharp curves I clip to the piping seam so it will curve. When applying the piping between seams I always use two steps: 1) sew the piping on one layer of fabric; and 2) sew the second layer on with the first seam up so I can see where I sewed down the piping. I move the needle position slightly to the left so that my first layer of stitching won’t show.

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    Kim @kmac0107

    Do you use a butcher twine, it’s 5 ply twisted or do you use a finer ply like kite string?

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    Jennifer1568 @Jennifer1568

    I was wondering the same thing..

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I use builders string.

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    It all depends on the look you are going for. If you want a thicker look, go for thicker string. If you want a more delicate look, go with the finer string. Make a couple samples for yourself and decide which you like best. Typically, on children’s clothes you use the finer string, though again, it is a preference. 🙂

    Carol

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    meleliza @meleliza

    I sometimes use yarn for baby piping. You can also buy piping string in various sizes by the yard in the decorators section of Joann.

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    Kim @kmac0107

    I am ready to make piping now so I will try different size string. The local Joann fabric store was destroyed by hurricane Irene so it’s been a challenge to get notions. Thank goodness for the internet.

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    yellow_blue @yellow_blue

    Hello all,

    Wow! I couldn’t be on the internet for a few days, and here I come back to see so many good suggestions on how to do piping. Thank you everyone. i have fabric cut for the sandbox skirt. I hope to try piping on that.

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    Jennifer1568 @Jennifer1568

    I put piping on the front of the School Photo dress last night using Catherinel’s instructions and it was a breeze. The piping looked more uniform and smaller than previous attempts. Thanks, Catherinel!

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    catherinel @catherinel

    Sorry, I hadn’t checked back since before Thanksgiving. Hope everyone had a good holiday. I actually was running out of my ball that I got 8 years ago and bought a new one. What I have is twisted cotton twine, called “tie-down”. It’s 8 very fine plies, like the kite string I remember from when I was a child. The brand I got is Blue Hawk, bought it at a big box home improvement store for about $3 for 128 meters. Can’t beat the price.

    Glad I could help.

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    dare moi @dare moi

    I piped for the first time last night!

    Thanks everyone for all the tips.

    xoxx s

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)

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