Oliver + S

Piping

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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    dare moi @dare moi

    So i have seen how these pants really benefit from a little piping around the top/front bit.

    I am a piping virgin, but get the general gist of it. Has anyone of you talented ladies done a piping online tute/pics for the sailbout shorts/skirt before?

    ta in advance,

    xoxx sharyn

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Are you planning to use ready made piping or are you going to make some yourself? I haven’t used it on this pattern (because I am still waiting for it to arrive) but piping is pretty much the main trim that I use so I am VERY familiar with it.

    To sew it on, I like to use a zipper foot and if you have an invisible zipper foot then that is better. You may like to tack it first so that it stays in place but I don’t because I’ve used it that often.

    The piping is generally 1/2 inch in width from the sewing line (that encases the actual piping) to the edge of the bias so you shouldn’t need to trim away anything prior to sewing.

    I like to sew it to one side first and then sandwich the fabric layers (ie if I’m doing a collar this would be a similar thing to what you want to do), pin (or tack) and follow the line I’ve already sewn but just a smiggen to the left of it. The first sewn line follows the sewn line that encases the piping and the second is slightly inside of the first line.

    All I can suggest is experiment first on scrap fabric (if you are able to) to see how it looks and feels while sewing to get your “piping” legs and then give the skirt/ shorts a crack.

    Making piping, well, I’m assuming you are planning on using ready made (easier for someone who isn’t familiar with this technique), but please tell me otherwise and I’ll be happy to share.

    I hope this is helpful to you

    Tamara

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    dare moi @dare moi

    I was considering making my own piping, because the ‘local’ sources (spotlight…) do not have much to offer). I have considered a ‘piping’ foot to make the experience less painful too.

    It would be good to get some good online sources of piping, for when i am feeling lazy, or in a rush.

    xoxxx s

    ta tamara

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Oh how exciting! It’s such fun making your own. Country Bumpkin sells mini piping cord in bundles of 5m (online) and they sell the ready made stuff also which is really nice to work with and not too bulky made by Aussie Heirlooms and you can even buy it in larger packs now which is great for stocking up. Just hop onto their site and look under ribbons and trims.

    Making your own is a cinch. Just cut 3inch bias strips sew them together (as you would do a quilt binding) for however long you want. Wrap the strip around the piping cord and sew next to it. Too easy.

    I don’t have a piping foot for my machine so I use a zipper foot instead and it does the job nicely. If your dealer recommends using a piping foot then I’d go with that but otherwise it isn’t a deal breaker.

    I’m not really sure of where else to get piping in Australia – I just get CB to send me some because I know they have it. Give them a crack first and if there are needlework type shops nearby, I’d check them out because you never know. Otherwise I know Farmhouse fabrics has piping and really nice stuff too but they are overseas of course.

    Good luck. I hope it works out and I’m looking forward to seeing the end result (or at least hearing about it).

    Cheers

    Tamara

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    Here’s a little written/picture demonstration to go along with Tamara’s information. http://www.pinkolive.ca/jordynnmackenzie/patterns/JMtutorial_piping.html Have fun making piping.

    Carol

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    emstone @emstone

    Ok, so I have a question for all you US ladies. Where do you get your baby cording to make piping? I looked at my local Joann and they didn’t have anything. I also ordered some size 1 from Fabric.com but what came in was huge. I am checking to make sure I got the right stuff but I would like to get some smaller stuff ordered so I can make some piping for a Tea Party dress I am working on. Thanks in advance for all the help.

    Erin

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    Mandy1977 @Mandy1977

    Did you look in the upholstery section (along the back wall) at Joann’s? I saw some small cording (and larger sizes too) there just yesterday. Just ask the sales people where the pleat tape and such is.

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    emstone @emstone

    I will have to check again when I go this weekend. I looked around but was shopping with my 2yo so I was a little hurried. Thanks so much!

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    I have used cording from the drapery department of the fabric store that works well, but I can’t always find what I want. I finally decided to make my own cording. You can take cotton ‘thread’ used for crocheting and some is thick enough to use as is, others I have crocheted a chain to make my cording.

    In the past year, I learned how to use a “Lucet”, http://www.lacis.com/catalog/data/AC_Kumi-Himo.html#BI61 (scroll down to the ‘cherry Lucet’) this is the one I have. I have had so much fun learning how to make my own drawstrings for various projects. You can get very clever with combining threads of various weights and colours to make your own cording. Obviously, if you are going to cover it with fabric, white or off white should do just fine.

    I suspect this store that sells the lucet also sells the various threads. I purchase mine from a supplier in Canada, but they do ship to the states and other places. The link to their store is here: http://www.shuttleworks.com/ I would suspect most fiber arts stores carry the cotton, linen or other threads needed for making your own cording.

    Carol

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    Nicole @motherof5

    shhhh I buy builders string from the hardware and pre-wash it.

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