Oliver + S

lightweight/durable/blackout fabric?

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    Profile photo of kgiffkgiff @kgiff

    I thought I’d check with your knowledgable ladies to see if you have any suggestions.

    I’ve been recruited to sew up a new curtain for my daughter’s preschool for their large, half circle window. It’s attached with velcro at the top during nap time to block the light so it is put up and taken down nearly every weekday each year.

    The current one is denim and has lasted about 5 years. It needs to be a dark color so it doesn’t show dirt/stains, and needs to hold up to lots of use/washings over the years and be light weight in order to stay up with velcro and be easy to put up and take down. Oh and not too bulky as it needs to be folded up and stored when not in use.

    Any ideas or suggestions for something that they may be able to get more than 5 years of use out of? Thanks again.

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    Profile photo of Liesl GibsonLiesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    I know you can purchase blackout fabric in white or black, and it’s designed to be durable and to really block out the light. If you use that, you could use almost anything on the “surface” (the side that shows) to make it pretty. I’m fairly certain it’s lightweight fabric and easy to work with. (Says the woman who never quite got around the making those blackout curtains for her daughter’s room but did all the research for them…)

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    Profile photo of thejennigirlthejennigirl @thejennigirl

    I’ve worked with blackout fabric, and it’s lightweight and durable. I use it as a lining/facing in curtains/drapes with ease.

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    Profile photo of kgiffkgiff @kgiff

    Thanks ladies! I was wondering about the durability of blackout fabric. I was assuming since it was just a liner it would not be very durable, but I guess I was mistaken. Very good information!

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    Profile photo of vothgirlvothgirl @vothgirl

    I bought really cheap blackout curtains at Walmart a couple years ago for my older daughter’s nursery. Not terribly attractive, but lightweight and pretty effective – and cheap! I think each curtain was about $8. Two years and a cross-country move (and one more child!) later, they don’t fit the windows in the house we have now. I cut up one of the cheapie curtains (it frayed horribly so I had to work quickly and gingerly) to make a blackout curtain for a much smaller window in the new nursery, and used some beautiful batik fabric in front. It wasn’t the most easy to work with fabric, but it was already on hand and was inexpensive. So that could be another option – just cut/dress up a cheapie blackout curtain.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Profile photo of vothgirl vothgirl. Reason: Toddler hit the keyboard as I hit 'submit'
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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    Rubber backed curtain fabric with washers sewn in the hem makes a very effective block out. Often curtain making shops will have remnants.

    @kgiff, you will be very popular with the school. I have 27 drawstring bags to sew for the 2/3’s. The teacher wants to sort the skipping ropes.

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    Profile photo of kgiffkgiff @kgiff

    @motherof5 wow that is quite the undertaking!

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    @kgiff, new teacher. I may as well earn a few Brownie points 🙂

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