Oliver + S

Instructions for cotton muslin receiving blankets

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • LINK
    Kim @kmac0107

    I would like to make some cotton muslin receiving blankets for my new grandson. I have googled for instructions and I read 35 x 35 and 45 x 45, round the corners and serge but they look sloppy. Also are they 2 layers or a single layer?

    LINK
    scgoble @scgoble

    I have not made these but had many store-bought ones gifted to us that we still use all the time (my daughter is 2 now). They are just one square layer of muslin with a narrow hem on each edge. I think bigger is better because now we use them for everything from stroller cover-up to picnic blanket.

    LINK
    homefire @homefire

    Hi, I just finished a bunch of receiving blankets for gifts. I usually make them 45 x 45 for versatility and I miter the corners. I figured it out by trial and error but here is a tutorial I just found that looks good http://stonegable.blogspot.com/2010/02/making-napkins-with-mitered-corners-sew.html . As for how many layers I don’t know. I personally use one layer of flannel.

    LINK
    Justine J @justmejay

    I’d make a rectangle as opposed to a square – easier for wrapping/swaddling – am just off to pick up kids, but I’ll measure mine to check the size! (a friend made mine to my size specifications!)

    LINK
    Nicole @motherof5

    I find a short stitch length wide zigzag the best finish and if you do several layers of muslin and then finish them as one you will get a wrap with a bit of stretch!

    I make square wraps,fold one corner down,and wrap on the bias. I can swaddle the wrigglest baby so it can’t get out!

    Mine were all swaddled until 9 months.(but it is personal,some mums can’t bear too)

    LINK
    meleliza @meleliza

    I think you all had better read the muslin thread to make sure you’re speaking the same language. 🙂 I can’t imagine making a receiving blanket out of muslin – you want something softer and with a little give in it. Also, I never saw the point of recieving blankets anyway. In the US, those are small rectangular ones made out of knits that are way to small to swaddle a baby in. I like those big 45″ sqaures of cotton flannel that swaddle a baby up nice and snug with no wiggling. My newest baby was born in a hot October, so I tried those aussie ones made out of what I would call gauze – is this what “muslin” means in Australian? – hoping they would be less warm than flannel. But they didn’t wrap tightly and she could squirm right out of them from the beginning. My very favorite are made by Swaddle Designs and have served me well through all three children.

    I swaddle mine until they don’t fit in the blanket any more. My 4month old measured 25″ at her checkup yesterday, so it won’t last much longer with her either.

    LINK
    dkbnyc @dkbnyc

    i make mine out of flannel. 45″ square. I either use one layer and do a small hem all around or more often- i use 2 layers of coordinating fabric. Sew right sides together, turn it right side out, topstitch around and add a few rows of quilting stitches through the middle of the blanket to hold the 2 layers together.

    I bought a muslin wrap for the summer from Aden + Anais- they were nice and lightweight

    LINK
    Kim @kmac0107

    Thank you for all of the information, my daughter asked me for gauze receiving blankets that she saw in a children’s store. My grandson is due May 28th so I think she is thinking about summer weight. She used receiving blankets a lot with my granddaughter because we live in New Hampshire and it tends to be cool at times throughout the summer. I googled for receiving blankets and it talks about cotton muslin. I also thought maybe double gauze, as Nicole had suggested more than one layer. I have some far far away but it is pink and expensive. Still researching and reading your comments.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

copyright

Unless otherwise credited, all work on this blog is © Liesl + Co., Inc, 2008-2017. You are welcome to link to this blog, but please ask permission before using any text or images.