Oliver + S

How to narrow the tea party sundress

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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    talialmi @talialmi

    My daughter is very skinny and narrow yet quite tall. I am quite clueless about narrowing the tea party sundress. I thought to make the front (and back) middle piece narrower on the sides, but I don’t know how to adjust the bodice. Will be glad for any tips on narrowing patterns in general and this one in particular.

    Thank you!

    Tali

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I would be inclined to take most of the excess from the centre front and back bodice and maybe a tiny bit from the side seams.

    I tend to size down and then lengthen a pattern but I can see how this one would work by making it narrower.

    I hope that is some help Tali.

    ~Nicole~

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I sew for a lovely tall but very narrow girl, I did what Nicole suggested and I started with a smaller size, in this case the size that fits around her chest. I then lengthened the skirt pieces by adding 3″ to the bottom of each skirt piece and redrawing the curves. I also cut the back bodice piece at the top of the button hole and added 1″ in here (by separating the two pieces 1″ and sticking another piece of paper behind them), this was a great move because it gives more armhole space/length while conserving the chest size. I added two button holes, but I don’t think she’s ever worn it on the smaller shoulder strap length. To get a hem facing that fitted, once I had the front skirt together I folded it in half and traced off the curve tot he depth of the hem facing and then used this as the hem facing. If you don’t want to redraft the hem facing you can finish the bottom with bias binding. It’s much easier to add length to a pattern than to remove width from the bodice.

    Here’s a photo of the dress.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/73669617@N07/7305705826/in/set-72157631360905590

    There’s a few others in my photo stream [just be aware there is also a matching dolls dress too :)]

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    mkhs @mkhs

    You can also very easily add length right above the notches in the skirt pieces– I add 2 inches here and the skirt still hangs very nicely.

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    talialmi @talialmi

    Thank you for the good advice! I will do as you all suggest and start from a smaller size.

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    theknittinganxiety @theknittinganxiety

    Hi talialmi,

    Check this post in O+S blog, can help if you go for Nicole’s suggestion.

    http://oliverands.com/blog/2010/02/lengthening-and-shortening-a-pattern.html

    Rita

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    Michellephant @Michellephant

    I have a similar question. I want to shorten the dress and read the blog post on how to do it. But I’m concerned that if I shorten it and redraw the lines that the center and side pieces won’t line up properly. I’m wondering if it does make more sense to take the length off the bottom and redraw the curve. Any suggestions?

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    mkhs @mkhs

    I would not take the length from the bottom– you’d be removing a lot of volume, and would also have to redraft the hem facing. I would take it out above the notches in the skirt. Also, check if you could just make a smaller size– the chest measurement is the important one in this pattern. And it doesn’t have a long skirt to begin with– it gets too-short rather quickly!

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I completely agree with mkhs,the pattern allows for generous bubby tummys. You may be able to size back!

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    Michellephant @Michellephant

    Well unfortunately my girl is on the fence of 2T so I bought the bigger size pattern to get more mileage out of it, so I can go down without buying another pattern. BUT you have successfully dissuaded me from chopping the bottom. I think I’ll just make the 2T as is and if it’s big…well it’s not like she gonna stop growing! (Also I’m going to fully line the skirt per Nicole’s blog post.)

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I do love this lined,we adore this dress in our house.

    It is Daddy’s favourite!

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