Oliver + S

How long does it take you to sew a dress like this?

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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    meleliza @meleliza

    I’m not good at keeping track of my time spent sewing. Sometimes this is a good thing! But right now it would be helpful to figure out a reasonable timeline for constructing a dress.

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    Tamara @justsewit

    It depends on how fast you sew and it you include trims etc. I would say allowing at least an hour to lay out the pattern and cut it would be ample for this step and a good 12 hours to sew the dress, taking into consideration potential need for unpicking and of course pressing time.

    When it is a style like this I like to take my time to get it right and usually I use things like mini piping to enhance the collar and sleeves. Allowing this time frame will also allow for any little mistakes concerning the zipper also and if you are learning a new technique.

    I think I’m a fairly slow sewer because I allow myself to get distracted due to the times when I sew. But how fast you sew will take into consideration how much time to allow yourself. Once you’ve made one you will generally quicken the pace anyhow.

    Hope this helps

    Tamara

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    meleliza @meleliza

    I am a slow sewer too, I think, and lately it’s gotten worse. I think I’ve allowed my inner perfectionist a little too much control! I’m so relieved to hear you saw 12 hours, though, I made a list of the separate steps and came up with 10-12 hours too. Not counting the crinoline! I have a fitting scheduled for tomorrow morning for my very first commissioned dress! I’m doing this for a friend, but considering it a trial and hoping it might lead to more.

    I’ve been dreaming of this pattern in handkerchief linen with embroidery and lace for a communion dress, wouldn’t that be lovely?

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Oh congratulations! How fun that sounds. Handkerchief linen would be pretty for a communion dress. Different from the satin things you find in that category. I could imagine the hem being scalloped with the embroidery. Oh the fun you could have with this pattern!

    Can’t wait to see your version of this dress

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I am a slow and careful sewer so only use this as a guide.

    I made similar dresses for a wedding(paid job) and they took me 20 hours each,including cutting and hand sewing.

    ~Nicole~

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    Jennifer1568 @Jennifer1568

    I think handkerchief linen and embroidery sounds beautiful. Please post a photo. I am planning cream colored silk and velvet. I bought a remnant of duponi silk and for the pattern to fit, I have to use it so the grain line on the pattern piece is perpendicular to the selvage. Will that work? I want to use the silk for the skirt part of the dress.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Thanks for all the feedback! So the little girl has chosen no collar or sleeves, which simplifies the dress quite a bit. She wants that bow, though! Still, I want to allow myself plenty of time to get a really perfect finish. After all, what’s the point of paying me good money for a custom dress if it isn’t perfect?

    but oh, wouldn’t this also be perfect for a little flower girl dress? Gosh I hope that cousin of mine gets married soon:)

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    Tamara @justsewit

    You could really go wild with this style – it is the classic termed as “square yoke” that is used in smocking. Flowergirls dresses yes! I made one for my niece to wear to my wedding and it had a pinktucked bodice with the pintucks crossing each other and set on a diagonal. It was basically this pattern with different sleeves and with the darts. I want to at least make a muslin for this today once our visitors depart so that I can make a start on the birthday dress – it won’t be a copy of the one from Homespun, I may leave that for Christmas.

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