Oliver + S

Hem help!

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    Profile photo of miss_sonjamiss_sonja @miss_sonja

    I’ve had this skirt completed except for the hem for a couple of months now. I can’t seem to figure out how to hem it evenly, with the curve of the skirt.

    Any help/guidance appreciated.

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    If you are finding it hard to get a nice turn, try basting a turning guide with a long stitch (#4). This will no only give you an accurate fold line but will gently ease the fabric.
    If it is not enough ease, you can gather the stitches, just a bee’s whisker.

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    Profile photo of NanaMarNanaMar @NanaMar

    I don’t have the Everyday Skirt pattern but I assume the hem is a turned one and one could use a gathering thread along the fold line of the turned hem, press the fold in, and with the hem turned up, gently pull the gathers to fit the curve wherever needed, pin in place then press again and sew by hand or whatever method the instructions suggest. Another approach, and my favourite way to hem a curved hem, is to make a facing 3 inches deep (resulting in a 2 inch hem), attach to the chosen length for the skirt plus a half inch for seam allowance – sew with a half inch seam, press then press open with seam allowances toward the facing side, edge stitch the three layers close to the seam line, press again this time with the facing turned in. Run a gathering stitch around the top of the facing at half an inch then press along this line, folding the turn to the inside. Now topstitch the hem from the inside, if this is an appropriate finish, or hand stitch the hem in place for a more finished look. This is the way that the Oliver and S patterns finish curved hems, e.g. in the Tea Party dress and the Family Reunion dress.
    I hope this helps.
    Marlene

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I love the first way shown in this blog. http://foursquarewalls.blogspot.com.au/2014/05/narrow-hem-three-ways.html
    I uses the serger and machine, is really easy and gives a great narrow hem finish 🙂

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    Profile photo of miss_sonjamiss_sonja @miss_sonja

    That Ban Rol technique looks amazing. I will have to see if I can get some locally.

    My sewing machine really does not like to do a basting stitch–the tension is never right on it. Very frustrating.

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    Profile photo of melelizameleliza @meleliza

    I just had a quick look at the pattern and I don’t see why the pattern instructions wouldn’t be the best way. The hem is only a little curved. turn it half an inch, then another 1 1/2 and ease in the fullness where it curved. It will be just fine.

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    Profile photo of miss_sonjamiss_sonja @miss_sonja

    It’s my lack of skill at successfully turning an entire skirt hem 1/2″ and then again. All attempts were wavy and unappealing. And my machine won’t baste properly.

    I found BanRol at the local fabric store, and will give that a try and let you all know how it worke.d

    One reason I really like sewing for my littlest is that size 2 things are so small, they are easier to finish nicely.

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    Profile photo of BrittneyBrittney @georgeandizzy

    Have you ever tried a hem gauge? They are life changing (IMO). I have this one and use it all the time. http://www.joann.com/prym-dritz-hem-gauge/1041250.html?mkwid=8wqEwP1I|dc&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_campaign=Shopping+-+Sewing&CS_003=10131488&CS_010=%5BProductId%5D&gclid=CjwKEAjw7MuqBRC2nNacqJmIpT0SJABQXAOt7YWuWMycoPdJMJEd26vYcAdiI_o0Oqj-DFduniYrpxoCh5vw_wcB

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    Profile photo of vothgirlvothgirl @vothgirl

    @georgeandizzy that’s awesome! I made one out of a piece of printer paper but the curved edge on the one in your link looks easier to use. Picking one up on my next trip to Joann’s!

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    Profile photo of miss_sonjamiss_sonja @miss_sonja

    I actually have a Clover hem gauge/pressing guide. Could not figure out how to use the darn thing.

    I think I need a support group!

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    Profile photo of BrittneyBrittney @georgeandizzy

    You fold your raw edge up to the inch you want. So if it says fold a half inch and then an inch, first fold your raw edge to the half inch all the way around and then fold to the inch. If you’d like I could pop up a pic on flickr.

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    Profile photo of miss_sonjamiss_sonja @miss_sonja

    A picture would be great. I did try it and the fabric just opened up again. I suppose I have to pin it heavily as well…

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    Profile photo of BrittneyBrittney @georgeandizzy

    @miss_sonja
    So basically, you lay your hem gauge on the wrong side of the fabric and pull the raw edge to the inch mark you want. Like in the second picture (don’t know why they reversed), I pulled it taut to the 5/8″ and ironed. You would do that to your whole piece you are hemming, then in the second picture I pulled it taut to the 1 1/2″ line, ironed, enclosing the raw edge.

    Sorry if I am not too clear, I have a hard time putting things eloquently, haha.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Profile photo of Brittney Brittney.
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    Profile photo of melelizameleliza @meleliza

    if your fabric doesn’t hold a press well, you might need to pin a lot yes. But you might also try pressing without steam.

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