Oliver + S

french seams with flat piping?

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    pippi @pippi

    I am getting ready to make another tea party dress and was going to try french seams for the first time. I am planning to use the flat pipping too though. Anyone have any experience here? Anything I should do differently with the piping in there? Or will it be too bulky?

    Thanks!

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    meleliza @meleliza

    I am the biggest fan of French seams I know, but I feel a little skeptical about adding flat piping. I suppose you would tuck it into the seam on the second pass? That could be tricky to align correctly. It will definiately add bulk, but if the fabric is lightweight maybe not too much.

    Maybe faux french seams, where you tuck the allowances into each other after sewing the seam, would be simpler.

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Is there any particular reason that you wish to use french seams?

    I am with Melanie on this one,I am sure it could be done but it would be bulky.

    How about lining the skirt?

    ~Nicole~

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    theknittinganxiety @theknittinganxiety

    Hi pippi,

    If you go forward with that idea or if you choose to do only the french seams for that pattern please dont forget to post some pics in the flickr. I have some corduroy and I that pattern is one of my options to use it (I am not sure yet).

    I sewed this pattern just once but without the flat piping, it was my 1st Oliver + S, and I used a simple zig zag stitch to finish, so If you really go for french seams I would love to see, because I think I learn a lot seeing other people projects.

    Rita

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    mkhs @mkhs

    I’ve done the flat piping twice, once in a loose, light gingham with false French seams, and once in a lawn with proper French seams (lawn for both piping and dress). I wouldn’t try it with any fabric heavier than lawn! If I recall correctly, I did grade the piping when I trimmed things back before enclosing the seam– helps to reduce bulk.

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    What about using french seams on the side and doing either regular or bound seams for the other seams. I would not recommend french seams for joining the bodice to the skirt as it is a very curved seam and trying to sew it twice would be awful.

    Rita a corduroy Tea Party sounds lovely.

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    pippi @pippi

    So I decided to forget about the vertical piping and just did the french seams along those lines (I am using corduroy and even with my very thin shirting for piping it would still have been too bulky I think) and attempted binding the curved bodice seam (but I didn’t really know what I was doing so it’s a little interesting). I LOVE the french seams though! I might be hooked. It just looks so nice inside and I hope it will be more comfortable. I would like to try this pattern with a lining sometime too, I’ve seen Nicole’s tutorial, but I figured this would be a little faster. This dress is wonderful in corduroy. I have done several in cord and it really accentuates the shape with the heavier fabric. I will post a pic when I get it all finished up.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Not only will it be more comfortable, it will wash and wear better as well. French seams are addictive!

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    Joanne @Joanne

    I am wondering if anyone has sewn the hem by machine instead of by hand?

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I have not ( as I line this garment ) but I would without hesitation
    I like my play clothes to be tough

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I always sew this hem on the machine. In fact I machine sew all my hems! Provided your happy with the look go for it 🙂

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    sosew @sosew

    I also machine sew all my hems!

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