Oliver + S

Fairy Tale Dress: Prepare the Skirt

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    Profile photo of tonyadeltonyadel @tonyadel

    I am confused on step 2 in the “prepare the skirt” section of the Fairy Tale dress pattern. I have sewn and finished the side seams. Then it says to “finish each center-back seam allowance to prepare for the zipper.” Should I finish the entire length in the same way, or does the part that is marked for the zipper get finished separately? I would appreciate a recommendation for how to finish this. Thank you.

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    Neaten the entire back edge before you sew the zipper in place.

    This can be with your method of choice but mark sure you do not lose any notches.

    I look forward to seeing your dress in the Flickr O+S Group pool.

    ~Nicole~

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    Profile photo of KarenKKarenK @KarenK

    I finish each side of the center back seam individually before sewing the back seam or adding the zipper. That way I have finished edges on either side of the zipper when it’s installed. Does that make sense? If not I can post a picture in the Flickr group for you so you can have a visual.

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    Profile photo of tonyadeltonyadel @tonyadel

    I appreciate the reply’s. Thank you for your help. I feel like I am still a bit confused. If I fold the entire edge over 1/4″ and then fold it over again 1/4″ and then sew that down, does that work for finishing the edge? The reason I am concerned is that I will lose 1/2″ of the edge, and it says in the instructions not to cut any of the edge. I will also lose visibility of the markings. So, I don’t feel like this is the correct method, but I don’t know any other way to finish the edges. I would really appreciate photos if you have them available. Thank you so much for your help.

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    You will need to neaten with a zigzag or overlock (serger stitch).

    Otherwise you lose the fabric you need to insert the zipper.

    This is a different dress pattern here http://fiveandcounting-motherof5.blogspot.com.au/2011/07/wren-wonderment-part-two.html but it should give you an idea.

    When I made the Fairy Tale dress I used an exposed zipper so not much help here I am afraid.

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    Profile photo of melelizameleliza @meleliza

    I wouldn’t turn it under. You will need the seam allowance to install the zipper. Frankly, I think this is optional, as the seam allowance will be covered by the lining. However, if your fabric is especially ravely or delicate, it may be a good idea to do it. It will help keep things a little tidier and easier to work with. If you dont have a serger, you can use a zig zag that goes right over the edge. My machine has an overlock feature, which is similar to a serged finish but with only two threads. I find it works pretty well for this purpose.

    Ps – “neaten the seams” is Australian and British for “serge”. You do not need a server to do a nice job, however. I typically do a French seam below the zipper, flattening it out a little at the base of the zipper, which gets covered by the zipper tape.

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    Profile photo of JaneJane @jesims

    My machine doesn’t do a good zig-zag stitch. It generally ends up eating the fabric. (This is a big reason why I have started shopping around for a new machine) I have a very love-hate relationship with my serger, which is that I more or less love to hate it because it frustrates me greatly. So, I finished the edges of my skirt by using a technique called Hong Kong binding (their term, not mine). Here is a link to a good tutorial: http://www.burdastyle.com/techniques/hong-kong-binding-seam-finish

    Jane

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    Profile photo of tonyadeltonyadel @tonyadel

    I completely understand now. Thank you for your help. I don’t know why I made this so difficult, but I will plan to use the zig zag stitch down the length of the inside. However, I appreciate the information on all the other options.

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