Oliver + S

Do you say Oliver AND S or Oliver PLUS S?

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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    mrsc1345 @mrsc1345

    The ladies at my local fabric store call these patterns Oliver plus S, and it drives me batty, because in my mind, it is clearly Oliver and S. But, I guess I don’t really know what is right, is it plus or and? I’m curious, what do you guys call it?

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    bren5kids @bren5kids

    And. 🙂

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    Jess M. @mommy2maria

    And. But I’ve seen the use of the “+” in quite a few of my favorite blogs for the 5 years or so, and I’m kind of addicted to using the + now! lol.

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    scgoble @scgoble

    And. But I am in the habit of using the plus sign to mean “and” so it makes perfect sense to me.

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    Lizabeth @Lizabeth

    it is like reading a math problem: “1 + 1 = 2” is read aloud as “one and one is two”.

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Suggest they look at the email address oliverands.com

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Gosh it is so confusing when people say things totally different to how they are supposed to be. It is all about where they are from and how that area pronounces things. Like AL – bany and ALL – bany two towns spelt the same pronounced different. I thought Grammar was generic?!

    Hope they are enlightened by the email address and cease to drive you batty.

    I like your very simple explanation Lizabeth.

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    sayiamyou @maraya

    Perfect Nicole.

    I see loads of people scribble something very similar to the “+” sign as a sort of short hand representation of “and”. No one else ever seen that? Because of this, I always read it as “and”.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    In math, I say “plus”. One plus one equals two. (or three or or four or five :)) But in language, the + is shorthand for “and.” i.e. the Watsons are Melanie *and* Tom, not Melanie *plus* Tom.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

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