Oliver + S

Divided by a common language

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 65 total)
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    Justine J @justmejay

    Heidi – I’m going with d/ other – you forgot cossie!

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I used to do limericks with an international chum and the results were so funny.
    I would rhyme llama with banana, for example.

    I should start a thread here…..

    I will, and see if anyone plays along.

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    Anonymous @

    I grew up in western (yes, it makes a difference) Massachusetts. There, we drank soda, ate grinders, and threw our trash in the basket. Now I live in Colorado, where we eat drink pop, eat subs, and throw the wrappers in the trash. My mom grew up in Kansas where they drink either pop or tonic and a soda has ice cream in it (I call it a float). Also in Kansas, they carry their groceries in a sack – not a bag.

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    Tamara @justsewit

    We used to call what you call those (lemonade with icecream) spiders. Don’t ask me why.

    When I was in the UK at age 8 we would buy sweets (we call them lollies) and pop was any fizzy drink.

    Just to twist the words further, we get the “dags” off when we crutch sheep! My mum used to refer to loose threads hanging off a seam as “daggy bits”.

    • This reply was modified 7 years ago by Tamara.
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    dubhels2003 @dubhels2003

    I hope it’s OK if I join in…

    Cossie/swim suit or swimming costume.

    Soda is specifically the fizzy soda water generally used for mixing with drinks. Soft drink or fizzy drink (if fizzy!) for general non-alcoholic drinks. Pop is used if you want to sound ‘vintage’!

    I love the variations in language, not just internationally but that exist across small geography. At university I remember people doing a list of the different ways of saying ‘drunk’, a typically pointless student activity. There were only brits involved, and the list was pages long.

    PS, this thread has made be want a Maccy D’s…

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    Justine J @justmejay

    @dubhels2003 – you’ve just reminded me of a funny story that happened to my brother – he and his girlfriend were backpacking around England – it was freezing, so they went into a shop selling clothes/woolly things and asked for a ‘beanie’ – the little old lady was most taken aback and insisted they had the wrong shop, and they needed one further up the road – which turned out to be a cafe – a ‘beanie’ to us (Aust) is a knitted hat – in England (I think they were in Cornwall), a beanie was a toasted baked bean sandwich (?) 🙂 – they then recounted the story at the hostel, and the Canadians there laughed as they called a ‘wooly hat’ a ‘touk’

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    Cossie! I knew I’d forgotten one but couldn’t work it out, thanks 🙂

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    Alex @GiddyAnts

    Love this thread! I grew up in the UK before moving to Australia when I was 16 so had to learn lots of different phrases and names for things.
    I think the funniest one was my first day at High School when the girls were discussing in great detail the new “thongs” they had bought. Just when I was wondering what sort of place I’d moved too one of girls realised that that in the UK thongs were very different to what they were talking about which were plastic sandals I would have called “flip-flops”

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    brenda1652 @brenda1652

    like the lady from western Mass, I used all the same terms she did,still do. Of course being from New England means that I toss off the “r” at the end of words, many times the “r’ that is in words too, who needs it? It makes my southern born husband nuts and he is always trying to correct me at our old age! According to him (and I must say he is right on this ), I say car as something like “kaia” (maybe. close but not quite it), roof is “ruff”, crayons are “crans”. Then of course we bought booze at “the packy” (short for package store, I guess inferring that the booze would be safely tucked away in discreet paper bags (which were called “paper sacks” when I lived in Texas), here in upstate NY it is the liquor store. My husband makes “pastries” for soups when I make dumplings with the same recipe, he wears bedroom shoes around the cabin while I prefer my slippers. He is from N. Carolina, raised by his Cherokee Gram and I am from Connecticut, my family from Maine, the towns and reservations of US crossing into the Canadian Nations (Indians and Scot ancestry). While we are at it, many folks in the US will try to correct us waen we say we are Indians, wanting us to use the term “Native Americans” that came out by white folks thinking it would be more politically correct. BUT, nobody ever asked the Indians and all tribes prefer the term Indians (visit any Indian tribal web site, we are indeed proudly Indians). I think Canada has it right using the term “The Nations” for Indian tribes and their designated lands. So, feel free to refer to American Indians as such, it shows more knowledge and respect than most folks here have. nough said on that. Here we say soda, all carbonated drinks,same in New England and this part of New York. Locals here (Argyle, NY)are proudly from Scot ancestors and they have their own accent, like most of the native Adirondack mountain folks. If you are new to the area and out of touch with the way things are done here in this scrappy farming community you are a “flatlander”.

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    brenda1652 @brenda1652

    and of course I still eat grinders. Here they eat subs but where I grew up in CT we launch subs at the Naval Base in Groton. How about meals? In CT we had breakfast, lunch, and supper. No dinners at all. Here it’s breakfast, lunch, and dinner. So I interchange the words, nobody minds so long as the food is on the table.

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    honeymadeit @honeymadeit

    My husband and I have been together for over 30 years and he still sits on the sofa and I on the couch. The kids use colors which could be crayons, colored pencils, or markers. We swim in a swim suit or bathing suit. We eat sub sandwiches. The evening meal is dinner. A jumper is a girls dress that you would wear a blouse under. We wear a knitted sweater when cold or a light jacket. When really cold it is coat weather with knit caps. No wonder they say English is the hardest language to learn. Oh, Mickey Ds is McDonald’s and Wally World is Wal-Mart.

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    Mel @Mel

    I love this thread! I’ve been trying to guess where people are from by the terms they use.

    When I was in university I went on an exchange with students from Canada, England, Spain and Belgium. We had a couple of days together before the course started to hang out and get to know each other a bit. On the first day of classes, one of the English students was chatting with his professor and a fellow Canadian greeted him (the student) with “How’s it going, wanker?” Needless to say, she caught on pretty quickly by their reactions that that was not the right time to use that term!

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    HAHA! That is hilarious! I remember having a hard time when I first went to London trying to get some uneaten food packed up at a restaurant. I asked to have it to go, then asked for carry out. I was down to miming that I wanted to eat the food I had paid for at another time and location and did not want to simply dump it into a napkin. Finally an exasperated nearby diner told them I wanted takeaway.

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    brenda1652 @brenda1652

    LOL!! they would have gasped in righteous indignation to hear me ask for a doggie bag!

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    What’s a grinder? Is it a sandwich? Because in Australia its a power tool! Normally an angle grinder, not so good to eat 🙂
    Oh, and the three meals a day are breakfast, lunch and tea. Although tea and dinner in this context are interchangeable. Supper is a light snack before bed!

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 65 total)

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