Oliver + S

Best brand of interfacing

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    Tassiemum @Tassiemum

    What is the best brand of interfacing to use when making clothes? I have been using a pellon light fusible interfacing but it doesn’t fuse properly. I was wondering what everyone else uses. Maybe a good interfacing could be added to the O + S supply shop.

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    Nicole @motherof5

    That is a great idea!

    I used to use a McCalls but Spotlight are not stocking it anymore.

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I haven’t found a good brand of interfacing yet, I just use what I’ve got on hand, but when I made the last few things I noticed that the fusing improves if I use a press cloth, ie any piece of thin fabric around over the top of the interfacing, between it and the iron.

    I would like to hear about good interfacing.

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    needlewoman @needlewoman

    I just buy the lightweight fusible interfacing from Spotlight. So far so good with it’s application. It’s important NOT to have the steam on when you iron it on, and to take it slowly. I agree with Heidi about using a pressing cloth (called a Rajah Cloth at haberdashery places); particularly in cases where you don’t want to scorch or overheat the fabric you’re sewing. I also keep it in a plastic sealed bag when I’m not working with it; seems to keep it gluey’ness better that way – especially in a humid climate.

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    mkhs @mkhs

    The best tip I’ve gotten for fusing interfacing is to use a damp press-cloth, and press until the cloth is dry. I use a white cotton dishtowel.

    I would also love to hear more/have access to “good” interfacings. I’ve read that Pellon is only good for a certain number of washes before the fusing fails. When I’m making something that will get heavy use or that I want to keep as an heirloom (like my wedding dress), I usually use fabric as a sewn-in interfacing– anything from muslin to light canvas to silk organza, depending on what I’m sewing.

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    I used to get a really great one at FIT, and they don’t carry it anymore. I”ll see if I can track it own for the shop.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    I have almost entirely given up on fusible interfacing. I got completely fed up with all the fusing and then the potential for a nice project to be ruined with bubbly interfacing. I use scraps of appropriate weight fabric For the project. There is a lot more choice, I think. Also, I find I like the way it feels in a garment much better, especially for summer things. It’s more breathable than the fusible stuff. I do like the fusible stuff for buttonholes, though.

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    Jennifer1568 @Jennifer1568

    So you baste it in and then trim the seam allowances? Do you use white cotton?

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    Jane @jesims

    I’m interested to know more about using fabric for interfacing. I didn’t know this was an option.

    Jane

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Yes, I baste it or sometimes just pins will do. I trim away the extra or grade my seam allowances after I sew the seams. I use voile, batiste or sometimes muslin (only good muslin for this purpose) depending on the weight of the fashion fabric. White, ivory, black or whatever, depending on the color of the fashion fabric. I find it really feels very nice and I like it much better. Of course you can buy non woven sew in interfacing too, but I find I have scraps of these fabrics laying around anyway.

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    Jane @jesims

    Can you do this for any instance interfacing is required or are there times when it would be better to use a commercial interfacing? For example, would a button hole still be strong using a lawn in place of a commercial type or is it best to stick to using this method strictly w/ collars and cuffs?

    Jane

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Well, I think there are times when fusible is better, though I think some of this is personal preference. I suppose its partly expereince too. I’ve had no problem using it for zippers and im trying to remember if what I used last time I made anything lightweight with buttonholes. I think the automatic buttonholes are firm enough that you don’t have to worry about them fraying, and since they work on lightweight fabircs, it may be fine to use sew in, but if you want to know for sure, experiment with scraps.

    I recently made a coat out of a fabric that frayed like nobody’s business. (imagine many many explatives here.) Also, the buttonhole foot doesn’t work through thick layers near seams, so I had to freehand the buttonholes. I really really wish I had used some seriously strong fusible behind them and I don’t know what possessed me not to, (I was afraid I would damage the nap) but the buttonholes have unraveled. So next time I have anything tht seems like it will ravel,I will use fusible. Though I suppose the better solution would be bound buttonholes. That’s just an awful lot of work.

    Maybe also when you need a lot of support and don’t want to use a bulky sew in? But then, there are vintage supplies out there too for tailoring. there was just an article in Threads by Susan Kahlje about using petersham to make a really sturdy and firm waistband.

    Please don’t take my opinion for any kind of golden rule, though. 🙂 Most likely, you’ll want to experiment for yourself and see what you like. Or maybe one day you’ll be out of fusible and won’t want to trek all the way out to the store with little ones in tow just to do a bit of sewing and will see what you’ve got on hand. 🙂

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