Oliver + S

Advice on how to lengthen After-School Shirt?

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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    knitsewreadlove @knitsewreadlove

    Hi Ladies, I sewed up the After-School Shirt last night, and I LOVE it! It’s looks precious on my 2 year old, and she’s already declared it her “new favorite shirt.” Unfortunately it came out shorter than I thought it would (and also my sweet daughter has had a growth spurt since I last measured her (2 weeks ago). I posted this question in the “What are you sewing now?” thread as well, but I’d love some advice: I was thinking of adding a length of fabric to the bottom and making a deeper hem that would be top-stitched above the seam where I joined the fabric (a la the ice cream dress). Would that be weird? Any other suggestions? I’m open to anything. My little one really loves the fabric and I don’t have enough to make a whole new shirt.

    And of course this afternoon, I’ll be adding length to my tracing BEFORE I cut out any more fabric. ;0)

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Could you add a ruffle?

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    Certainly you could do that adjustment. I would suggest another option, though. I think what I would do is add a coordination fabric to the shirt, if you have one. I would cut the length of the shirt, divide it up so it looks like what you want, then insert the coordinating fabric there, ending with your already stitched up hem. I would then take the coordination fabric and possibly make a piping or edging of some kind or even covered buttons and tie the two fabric together, making it look deliberate in design. You could even bind the hem of the sleeves with the coordinating fabric, to help tie it in. I tend to like to ‘insert’ a coordinating fabric to add length, rather than add it at the bottom and having it look like it was ‘added onto’.

    When I insert fabric, I tend to use a 1/3 rule. I like the ‘colour blocking’ of the fabrics at 1/3 marks making it look deliberate. And, as in many design rules, it’s better to have odd numbers rather than even, though you do not have to follow that rule. 🙂

    Play with your options and have fun designing. 🙂 I look forward to seeing what you choose for a solution I am sure it’s going to be great! 🙂

    Carol

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    knitsewreadlove @knitsewreadlove

    Motherof5 and Carol, thanks so much! I do have coordinating fabric as I’d been planning this fabric for the 2+2 Blouse before my After-School pattern came in the mail. I love the idea of binding the sleeves as well to tie the fabric in elsewhere. This tired, pregnant mama needs all the creative help I can get these days!

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    knitsewreadlove, if you have enough coordinating fabric and decide to go that way, cut carefully and maybe you will have enough to make a coordinating skirt to go with the lovely new shirt making for a wonderful ensemble. 🙂

    Nicole’s ruffle idea would be lovely too, perhaps in a coordinating fabric? Again, you could then make a skirt out of the coordinating fabric. 🙂

    Happy Sewing,

    Carol

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    OK…I just read my first post…obviously I meant a coordinating fabric! 😛 I try to do too many things at once and my typing always suffers. 🙁

    Carol

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Knitsewreadlove, I think I may be repeating what has already been said, but, maybe if you add an extra band of fabric (either contrasting or coordinated) and to hide the seam add maybe ric rac or ribbon with a bow at the sides? That will give it something different and will “look” like it isn’t added to (should you use the same fabric). You could also do this with a ruffle to make it look like you didn’t add – but it is part of the pattern (when it really isn’t).

    A band at the bottom is always good if you come unstuck and find something is a bit shorter than expected and it won’t shout “I made a mistake”. You can use it as an embellishing element.

    Hope this is helpful.

    Tamara

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