Oliver + S

About to give up (I can't find the right size)

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    Profile photo of InmaInma @Frindmi

    I chose this dress to make for my daughter’s second birthday in June. She is 19 inches(chest) and 19 3/4 (waist). According to her measurements she should be a size 12-18 so I made a muslin bodice and it felt too tight. OK, I made the next size up 18-24 and it fits perfectly…right now…but it doesn’t look like it has any room to grow and she is still 4 months from her birthday. Then I made a size 2T and while it fits nicely around the belly it’s too big around the shoulders and chest area. What do I do?

    I really like the dress. I think the instructions are great but unfortunately I don’t have the time to fiddle with sizes and, what’s most important, I don’t think I’m skilled enough to do that.

    Would it work if I sew the bodice only with 1/4 inch seam vs 1/2 inch? I know it’s not much but maybe it will do the trick? I’m to the point of finding another pattern. 🙁

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    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    I wonder if it’s more of a shape issue than a size issue — would leaving the darts unsewn on the 18-24 leave enough belly room while still fitting nicely around the shoulders? I don’t recall whether the 18m size has the waist darts? Unfortunately it’s hard to predict how much a kid that age will grow in four months, but I can understand wanting to get the sewing done in advance. Do you have a pretty good sense of how much ease you want to leave?

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    Profile photo of InmaInma @Frindmi

    Thanks, Sarvi. The 18/24 month size does not have darts. It really fits great for right now which makes me wonder it will be on the small side in June. Problem is that the 2T will still be big in June, I believe. I don’t think she will grow enough in the chest area in four months given her latest trend.

    Maybe this is not the best style for a growing toddler?? I just love the way it looks so much!!

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I would use the larger size if you really don’t want to try and merge 2 sizes, however if you’re willing to try it’s not to hard.
    I would trace the 18-24 size through the shoulder, neckline and half way down the armhole. Where all the armhole lines cross over I would change to tracing the size 2T for the rest of the bodice. I think this would be the easiest way.
    I’ll see if I can make some pictures, they won’t be from the fairytale as I don’t have the pattern but I think I can find something else for an example 🙂
    I realise it’s frustrating but it’s worth trying and not giving up. The other thing is almost no one will notice if it’s a little to big as lots of kids wear clothes to big through the shoulders, especially if they need extra length in RTW 🙂 Even in a too big dress she will look gorgeous and have a beautiful dress to grow into.

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    I am with Heidi on this one. This is a dress that will look okay a bit big, particularly if you have a bow to cinch it in at the waist, it also looks very pretty swinging a little free.

    You sound as if you really want to make it? So make it in the 2T and it will fit, at some point. You can always add a largish hem too.

    🙂

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    Profile photo of ReeniReeni @Reeni

    I would make the 2T. If she feels awkward with the shoulders too big, (sometimes we forget that the actual wearer’s comfort is the most important!:D) you could make some discreet vertical tucks along the shoulder line to pull it in a bit for now… most children start getting long without gaining breadth around this time, so she can grow into the shoulders and if/when she loses the belly you can put the waist darts in.
    This style is quite fitted, so don’t despair if it takes some trial and error to get the right size. Other o+s patterns are more flexible in sizing.
    If you are considering choosing another pattern, ask yourself why you like this dress… is it the sleeves, or the bow at the waist? if so, maybe you can make a less fit-sensitive dress with the elements that you do like.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Profile photo of Reeni Reeni.
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    Profile photo of InmaInma @Frindmi

    Thank you for the replies! If I were to try and do a mash up of two sizes like one of you suggested tracing the 18-24 through the armhole and then doing the 2 T for width of belly area and height, would I need to do the 2T tulip sleeves? I did the muslin with one of the sleeves (the 2T size) and it still looks big.

    I know other people wouldn’t probably notice but I will LOL

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    Profile photo of ReeniReeni @Reeni

    I’d do the 18-24 mo tulip sleeve, because it attaches to the shoulder… the difference between the sizes in the sleeve piece is about 1/4 inch, so a little more or little less on the overlap should not be obvious.

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    Profile photo of Lightning McStitchLightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    In my experience of growing children (n=2) they don’t get wider from the age you’re talking about, just taller.
    If you want the dress to fit nicely on her birthday then make the smaller size with maybe an extra inch of skirt length.
    But, the slightly bigger size will undoubtedly look beautiful. I’m sure we’re not talking sack size, right.
    If your sewing time is precious/limited then make the size 2.
    For what it’s worth, I have fit children who are slightly tall for their age. I’ve just made the size 4 for my 4 year old, but she can still, just, squeeze into her size 2 Fairy Tale dress. Thankfully I added length, and so it has lasted two years!
    One of two things happens with the Fairy Tale dress. Either the kid loves it so much they wear it every chance they can til it’s way too small, or, you love sewing it so much you just keep making more and they’re never without one that fits.
    We’ve got both scenarios going at our house! You won’t go wrong, go for it!

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