Oliver + S

What to do with 1/2 yard cuts of Liberty

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    Profile photo of sarsouroursarsourour @kookiblah

    When I was in NYC recently, I purchased a bunch of 1/2 yard cuts of beautiful Liberty of London fabrics from Purl Soho (love that store, btw). In the moment I felt I had already spent so much money on fabric (at Mood) that I thought I could get away making things with 1/2 yards. What was I thinking?! I ALWAYS buy 2 yards at a time. So anyway. Is there anything I can make with half yard cuts in a size 4T? I was hoping to maybe squeeze some swingset skirts out of them, and be able to use what’s left as the yoke on the swingset top. I’m worried I won’t be able to use them for clothing at all now and that makes me sad. 🙁

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    Profile photo of InderInder @Inder

    Trim all the things!! Plackets, bias binding, contrasting collars, cuffs, etc.

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I wrote up a list of Oliver and S patterns that only used half a yard a while ago. I’ll see it i can find it.
    I remember the badminton top and Swingset tunic being on there. I think you’ll need some contrast fabric to make it work.

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    Profile photo of Rachel Le GrandRachel Le Grand @nestfullofeggs

    @kookiblah a Lazy Days skirt, a 2T or 3T Popover Sundress (at least the main part of the dress), I’m wondering about the Seashore Bloomers, all of the O+S doll clothes, hair accessories.

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    Profile photo of Rachel Le GrandRachel Le Grand @nestfullofeggs

    @with-love-heidi I cannot wait to see your list!

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    Profile photo of jaxjax @capnjax

    I like Inder’s suggestions. Also, covered buttons!

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    Profile photo of mkhsmkhs @mkhs

    You can’t get a 4T swingset skirt out of a half yard, but with careful cutting it works wonderfully for the tunic– as long as you use something else for the lining. I find I use the tunic pattern often for my really precious pieces. My daughter gets two summers out of them, so it’s a good one to splurge on. The bottom part of the ice cream top, especially with Liberty as it’s so wide. I make it up extra long. And the pinwheel slip is lovely, that would be a great place to use it as bias trim (do add length to the skirt). Use it as a contrast yoke in the hide and seek dress. Flat piping and hem facing for the teaparty dress. Kaufman lawn is a good solid-color pairing with Liberty Tana lawn.

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    Profile photo of miss_sonjamiss_sonja @miss_sonja

    Bucket hat?

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    Profile photo of Liesl GibsonLiesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    I’m with @Inder–use it or trim and yokes and details and you’ll get lots of mileage out of it! But I love @with-love-heidi‘s list! Can’t wait to see it.

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    Profile photo of LucyMLucyM @LucyM

    I agree with Rachel that Lazy Days skirts are perfect uses of 1/2 yard cuts. One can get creative by including in-seam or patch pockets with contrasting fabric. One can vary the shapes of the patch pockets for visual interest. Instead of ribbon for the hem, one could use a hem facing and finish it in the style of the Family Reunion dress, or put a pretty ruffle on the hem for added length if needed. I look forward to seeing what you work out.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Profile photo of LucyM LucyM.
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    Profile photo of sarahd2711sarahd2711 @sarahd2711

    The skirt and/or bodice of the ice cream dress works well with small cuts of fabric too.

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    Profile photo of catherinelcatherinel @catherinel

    You could piece it together (if they go together well), or with coordinating solid or stripe or gingham in large horizontal bands and make the popover sundress.
    The voile is usually not a good bottom weight, but if you underlined it you could get a sailboat skirt out of half a yard.

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