Oliver + S

Travel or mini irons

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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    Tamara @justsewit

    I’m being subject to yet another “lovely” power outage, the second for the day and it is barely 9am! We have a generator to run the basics in the house but when it comes to sewing, it won’t handle the iron.

    I am thinking of buying a smaller iron, like a travel or mini iron for the times when we have to use the generator for power.

    Has anyone tried them? What are they like and would you recommend any of them in particular?

    Tamara

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    LisaMM @LisaMM

    Hi Tamara,

    I bought a travel iron when I travelled around Europe over 10 yrs ago and I found it struggled to get really hot so my clothes never looked that ironed. I have seen a really small iron in a fabric store for those small jobs. I’m sorry I can’t recall the brand but it might be worth a check?

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    cybele727 @cybele727

    Wait, your generator can handle a sewing machine, but not an iron?

    wow.

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    Robin @Robin

    Anything with a heating element requires a lot of power. Kettles, blow dryers, space heaters etc… I really disliked the wand type iron I used to have. It never really did anything but burn my finger tips. Somebody needs to come up with an iron we can plug into a propane tank!

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    icicle @icicle

    Super expensive (and scary!) is this option: butane iron — no electricity, no cord

    https://www.lehmans.com/p-1106-butane-clothes-iron.aspx

    Sad irons are cheaper if you have a way of heating them:

    https://www.lehmans.com/p-2508-sad-clothes-irons.aspx

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    icicle @icicle

    Here’s a post on butane irons and a video of one being used. Not so scary…

    http://www.granny-miller.com/butane-clothes-iron/

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Thanks ladies,

    I think it would probably be the Clover mini iron LIsaMM as this seems to be very popular amongst quilters. I have been looking at that one and because it does little jobs, it could end up being the one. I only require one for sewing during outages as the wattage for the normal iron (a Tefal) send the generator clouding in smoke and looking ready to launch!

    Icicle, thanks so much for providing thise links. It would be good to hve one on standby, the only thing is I need to have it on some sort of hotplate to heat it and I only have gas (thankfully we can still cook without power) which, being in the stitcks is the only way to have a kitchen running t a decent capacity.

    I did see a review of a travel iron somewhere in a quilting magazine. I think I will just have to dig it out and see if I can do my research on it. It is the wattage that is my main concern but the more it has the better it irons so really it is a catch 22!

    Thanks anyway ladies. You have given me, as always, food for thought.

    Tamara

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    dubhels2003 @dubhels2003

    I have a clover mini iron which I find great for corners in patchwork, but, if i’m honest, not so great for dress making. It lacks the weight which help get things flat. I used it ironing seams open etc, and even then with some fabric finger pressing was more effective. That said, I can’t imagine being without some kind of iron while sewing and my mini iron is definitely better than nothing! I don’t think I could cope with your power outages!

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Thanks I will keep that in mind. I understand you can get different sized heads for them now so I will look into that also. I think it would be handy to have for pressing collars and cuffs and to press the folds of pockets and things. I cannot imagine pressing dress skirts though so it would limit but also open opportunities to actually be able to get on with something rather than be frustrated at the fact you are not able. I hate outages but they are something to expect with the storms we have and I am grateful for the generator as I know some farming families have to rely on generated power all the time. In a perfect world we would do away with the power company altogether and go for wind turbines and solar instead but we don’t have that kind of money to through around – a winning lotto ticket would do it for us though!

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    Mama_Knowles @Mama_Knowles

    My grandmother just sent me a wooden hand iron, it does seem to really work. She has used her for a while now and loves it. She uses it when doing between presses but it might work for when your power is out. I’ll have to give it a better go as I sew together Sarah’s Roller skate dress and let you know how it works out. I’ll have to post a picture of it for you. It’s not much but like I said it seems to work.

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    The thing with irons and sewing is that you really want STEAM to get a good press. I’m sort of wondering whether a damp washcloth or a spray bottle and your fingers would work better than the mini irons, which have no option for steam anyway. Mama Knowles, when you mention the wood hand iron, do you mean a flatiron like the old-fashioned ones? My grandma had a beautiful collection of them. (I wonder what ever happened to them.) I think you were supposed to heat them on the stove and then quickly iron while they retained the heat, right?

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    Mama_Knowles @Mama_Knowles

    Liesl it a little hand tool made only of wood that does not heat up. A fellow that lives in Florida made it for his wife a few years ago when she complained about getting up and pressing the fabric on the quilt she was making. He came up with it so it would save her trips to ironing board. I’ll post a picture in morning of it when I don’t have the baby.

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    Mama_Knowles @Mama_Knowles

    here is what this this wooden iron looks like, I guess really more of a hand press? Any way here’s the link!

    Wooden hand press

    Wooden hand press

    It doesn’t work as well as stream pressing with an iron but it does work way better than hand pressing!

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    That is really interesting! The first thing I thought is it could be great for teaching kids to sew, they could press their seams without having to worry about burning themselves on the iron.

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Yes, it might a great tool to have in general! Thanks for linking the pics Sharon!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)

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