Oliver + S

Top-stitching a knit

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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    Profile photo of rachelgoldrachelgold @rachelgold

    I’m using an AMH interlocking knit to make the playtime dress and am about to top-stitch the neckline detail – Should I use a straight stitch or a stretch stitch for that step?

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    I like to use a slightly longer straight stitch on knit.

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    Profile photo of roundtheworldgirlroundtheworldgirl @roundtheworldgirl

    I used a plain straight stitch on mine (and a walking foot). This normally wouldn’t work well on my machine, but my fabric was a relatively stable Michael Miller interlock. The interfaced facing on the other side helped to make it even more stable.

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    Profile photo of SherrySherry @mim22

    Don’t forget to use a stretch or knit needle, you won’t get any skipped stitches. I used to use the same needle for everything then went to a Bernina class a whole new world appeared. I couldn’t believe the difference it made using the correct needle on the fabric, especially how easy it was using a jeans needle on jeans and really thick fabric. I don’t mind hemming jeans anymore

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    Do you have the lighting bolt stitch on your machine? I have been making 3 TMNT costumes with fleece and bias cut cord onto 4 way stretch knit and the lightning bolt gave me the best stitch with minimal puckers or wavyness, it also looks almost like a straight stitch.

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    Profile photo of KarenKKarenK @KarenK

    I like a longer straight stitch with a ball tip needle when top stitching. A good steamy press can sometimes straighten out any stretch that might happen, too.

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    Profile photo of rachelgoldrachelgold @rachelgold

    Thank you so much for the suggestions – I went with the longer straight stitch for the top-stitching and that seems to have worked great. I do have a lightening bolt stitch I used in other places, like the neckline seam.

    Unfortunately, I got to the waist and despite my best efforts, it ended up very stretched out (I even got some of that clear elastic after reading another post on the issue)! I will take a breather then go back, take the seam out, and make another attempt – maybe stretching the elastic ever so slightly as I go. I knocked out a couple of pairs of the leggings in an effort for some instant gratification consolation. The leggings have worked wonderfully for me – 5 pairs (and counting) and they get lots of use – I will be swimming in little girls’ who wear leggings for years to come and am happy to be armed with a good go-to pattern 🙂

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

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