Oliver + S

Skorts – any ideas?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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    Tamara @justsewit

    Thinking ahead to when the weather starts warming up, I want to utitlise some of the Oliver + s patterns and make some pairs of skorts for miss 8 to wear to school.

    I’m looking at either the 2 + 2 skirt which I know would be the classic pleated school skirt type or the music class skirt to attach a pair of short shorts underneath as the requirements are skorts or shorts.

    Of course with the 2 + 2 I’d have to do some major size adjustments but I’m figuring this may be better in terms of room – not so sure about the shorts attached and how.

    Has anyone got any suggestions as to how I could go about doing this at all? Not made skorts as such before as not had the need until now.

    Would the picnic shorts be capable of going under these skirts and be successfully attached? I’d have to adjust bands and things for elastic wouldn’t I?

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    scgoble @scgoble

    I have been thinking about doing the same thing. I bought two skorts from Old Navy recently and they have become invaluable to our summer wardrobe. I was thinking of using a very simple shorts pattern with no fuss or embellishment – just two pieces sewed up the middle. I’ve not made a 2+2 skirt yet, so I don’t know about that waistband…

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    beachmom @beachmom

    I’ve never done it but here are a few ideas until someone else responds…

    http://www.ikatbag.com/2009/07/skorts-summer-skirts-epilogue.html

    http://www.oliverands.com/forums/topic.php?id=368

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    Are you wanting to use woven or stretch fabric for the shorts part of the garment? I have done similar garments with swimwear for my daughter. Basically, if the skirt you choose has an elastic waist, and your shorts do as well, but the bulk of the skirt is more, you would put your pleats in, first, then I would run a basting stitch along the upper edge and draw up the fullness a bit, just to match up with the shorts. I would then baste the two garments together and treat the waist area as one garment, applying your waistband or flipping over the top creating a casing for the elastic.

    I was just reading through the directions for the Music Class Skirt for a project. I am hoping to skip the waist band as described in the directions and just lengthen the upper portion of the skirt by the needed amount, then flip over the edge for a casing. There is a ‘rtw’ technique for elastic casings that I learned last year and I am hoping to use it on this skirt. It speeds up the process and looks very professional.

    Carol

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    Aussie Gal @Aussie

    It’s not Oliver + S, but these patterns are easy to follow and might be what you are looking for. http://www.makeitperfect.com.au/MIP/Playtime_Skort.html

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    sarahb @sarahb

    I’m planning on using the 2+2 and Music Class skirts for my girls’ uniforms skirts also, and my grand plan is to sew knit shorts into the waistband. I haven’t started yet, but the posts beachmom linked to sound like what I was thinking of.

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Thanks ladies for responding. The link to the tutorial looks very interesting – will stick this where I can find it easily I think.

    I was thinking stretch pants underneath initially so it would be less bulk and more comfort. It gets so hot here in summer (we are talking 47 degrees C!) so we need something that will be comfortable. But having had a quick look at the tutorial I’m beginning to wonder whether just cotton shorts would be more straight forward. I am only looking at making five pairs to start – a week’s worth.

    Someone at school saw the music class skirt and said it would be brilliant for school as skorts. I think this would probably be my first choice seeing as it is already in her size and I don’t have to do much in order to make it fit. If I went with this style to start then later I could play around with the 2+2 skirt to get it sized properly (she’s a 12 going on goodness know what next!)and then make some to try out before doing more for school.

    What’s rtw Carol? That technique sounds good and quick which is what we would all be after I should think. So you would lengthen the skirt panels at the top to cater for the width of the waist band and then attach the shorts and make casing – I like the sound of that. Or would you lengthen the top of the shorts also to make the casing?

    Sarahb what size would you be doing for those skorts?

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Where are you that it gets that hot?! I would suggest forgetting the skort and just molding a bodysuit from ice.

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    Tamara, (rtw) = Ready To Wear garments. 🙂 Sorry, I should have made that clear. I was going to try and look up the technique so that I could quickly link to it….saving me the time in trying to take pictures. I will try to do that soon. 🙂 I have two extra small children to look after, giving me such joy, but lots of work. 🙂

    I need to look back at the pattern. I am thinking I would raise the length of the panels, at the top. I suspect I won’t eliminate the seam allowances or I might only eliminate 1/2″. The way the “waistband” is made gives the impression of a sewn on waistband, but it’s not. 🙂 A friend took the class at Expo and then shared the technique with me. 🙂 If I can’t find information on line, I’ll try to do a written explanation. Children are sleeping at the moment so I’ll attempt right now….

    Carol

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    OK, I couldn’t find what I wanted on line so here is a quick written description. If you have questions, please feel free to ask. ? This is a general description for elastic waist for a skirt. I use a serger for this, but perhaps you could use an overlock stitch on your machine, possibly a zig zag?

    You obviously need to add length to the top of the skirt for the ‘waistband’. Then you need to figure out the size elastic for the size waist you are making the skirt for. Take into consideration the seam allowance at the side seam when making the final calculation.

    You will be sewing up the panels, but not the final panel, leaving it open until the elastic is sewn on and the waistband put together.

    I stitch the elastic onto the skirt, with the bulk of the elastic on the fabric, not off it, in other words, top of elastic to top of skirt, wrong side of fabric.

    Once that is stitched on, I flip the elastic over to the wrong side, and then once more, back the other direction, creating a fold, making the fold just ever so slightly into the fabric, not exactly at the end of the elastic. With that slight bit of fabric in the fold, this is where you will be stitching, along with the end of the elastic. Essentially what you are doing is serging off that fold. When done with that, you can flip over your nice new waistband. 🙂 Then, you close up your side seam. I love this method. The first time I did it, I found the waist was a little large, so I had to take it in a bit, but with my serger, it was a piece of cake to clean it up. One must remember ‘negative’ ease with elastic. 😛

    I hope this gives you an idea. I took a few pictures of one of my skirts. I’ll try to post those pictures later….children are up and I have to go. 🙂

    Carol

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Sarvi – Midwest Western Australia where it never snows but feels like it will in winter which only traditionally lasts 3 weeks (we’re having an extended version this year lol) and yes a molded suit of ice would be cool but it would melt by 7.30am. We get up very very early to work – have a big break from 10 – 3pm when the sea breeze hits and then back out the paddock until there is no more light. Air con goes flat out and we don’t want to move in the heat of the day.

    Violaisabelle I think I had a very blond moment yesterday! Duh! of course it means that! More brain training me thinks.

    Thanks for the instructions will make time over the school break to experiment.

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    sarahb @sarahb

    I will be making size 7 skirts probably, and add a bit of length too. One of my girls turns 7 next week and the other is 5, but they are practically the same size, the younger is just a bit shorter. They have both grown so much over the last month the size 6s I made them in May that were clearly below the knee are now seeming a bit too revealing.

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    I uploaded the pictures of the waistband. I hope they help with the description. You can see the photos in these links: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33022738@N08/5914011319/in/photostream http://www.flickr.com/photos/33022738@N08/5913988253/in/photostream http://www.flickr.com/photos/33022738@N08/5913988027/in/photostream

    If you want to view the finished skirt, I blogged about the details here: http://stitchedbyhislove.blogspot.com/2010/11/wool-salsa-skirt-warmth.html

    If I get to making some skorts, I will probably use cotton knit for the shorts with a woven cotton skirt.

    Carol

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Oh I know all about kids shooting up in height – try a whole 4 inches thank you very much! Oh well keeps you busy at the sewing machine and there isn’t any other place we all feel happier at so that has to be a good thing in a sense to grow like steam. Oh but then I have the pre primary teacher saying my son’s trousers keep falling down! Next pair of school pants will have button tightening on the waist to combat the good ol’ plumber’s crack! I need to shop for better quality elastic.

    Thanks for the photos Carol. Will have a good look at them and the blog post too – first coffee to warm up everything including a rather sore throat (this better only last five seconds – it’s school holidays and I can’t afford to get sick!)

    Yes that is what I think too after all this pondering. Knit shorts would be more comfortable I think.

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Photos = visual confirmation of mentally going through the written instructions from your previous post = Got it!

    Thank you so much Carol, I now feel confident to try this method.

    Tamara

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