Oliver + S

Shorten Popover to tunic length?

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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    isewstuff @isewstuff

    I’d like to shorten the popover sundress to tunic length. Any suggestions on the best way to do it?

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    April Henry @April1930s

    Goodness, I’m no pattern designer, so until the O+S expert pops in with the scientific method of perfection, I would just measure your child to where you want the length to be, add an inch or more depending on your desire for hem allowance and then compare that measurement with the pattern pieces (don’t forget the yoke piece is folded in half lengthwise with 1/2 inch seam allowance on both long sides. The ties would remain the same.

    If you don’t want to actually cut the pattern piece itself, you can make a 2nd tracing – one for the tunic and one for the dress.

    GREAT IDEA!!

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    madebymum @madebymum

    Hi Did anyone shorten the dress into a tunic top?

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    janimal @janimal

    Someone just posted a shortened Popover to shirt in the FlickR group.

    I think if you can get your little on to stay still for long enough for you to hold the main paper pattern piece to their chest for just long enough to eyeball where you want the tunic length to me, you could make a little pencil mark and take it from there…

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    I find that the easiest way to shorten is to measure up from the hem and draw a new cut line. If you want to shorten by 6″, draw the line 6″ from the existing hem to create a new cut line.

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    sahmcolorado @sahmcolorado

    I posted the pic on flicker yesterday. What i did was hold the dress pattern up to a shirt with a length that I liked. I aligned the underarm part of the dress with the underarm part of the shirt. I basically just moved the hem up like Liesl says, but I did it by cutting the pattern in 2 and physically moving the bottom up and tracing the curve where I wanted it.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

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