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Sewing machine problems

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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    Mama_Knowles @Mama_Knowles

    My sewing machine has been acting up for over a week now. The bobbin thread has been skipping and the needle has been braking. I am working on three of the exporer vests and it has been taking me over a week to sew them due to the problems. (not like me at all, it should have taken about two to three days tops)I have adjusted the bobbin a thounds times and have done everything I can think of to fix it. My sewing machine is a brother and I have had it for 13 years now, it was bought at Walmart. Is there something I can do to fix it or do you think it is getting ready to quit?? Any advice/tips would be great!!

    Sharon

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    Robin @Robin

    Hi Sharon, Take your machine in for servicing. It’s amazing how much better they work after a good tuning and oiling. Then there is the mysterious “timing” that always has to be fixed on my machine. Unless of course you’ve done this already. Sorry, I know how frustrating this is. Good luck! – Robin

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    thejennigirl @thejennigirl

    When was the last time you cleaned out your bobbin area? Lint build up can wreak havoc on a project. Make sure you’re not putting your needle in backwards, and check to see if little fingers have messed with your tension.

    If all else fails, take her in to be serviced. If she’s dying, and you decide to look into a better quality machine, try checking out vintage machines from the 1950’s & 60’s (like Singer 400 series & 500 series, many of which will give you different stitch patterns AND sew like a dream!).

    Good luck, and keep us posted!

    Jenn

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    heidileeann @heidileeann

    I have a brother and had the same exact problem recently. It turned out that the bobbin case had gotten nicked and then it would catch the thread and cause the thread and needle to snap in half. The part had to be ordered, but I believe it only cost me about $25 and I was able to put the new part in myself.

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    Mama_Knowles @Mama_Knowles

    Thanks ladies! I did check all the “normal” problems, little fingers seems to be the biggest problem I run into. I did just clean out the lint from it about a week or two ago and check that too with no help. I am wonderding if it is the bobbin case, the last time it was working a thread had gotten stuck in it. I not sure if it did something funny to it or not. I have tried to fix the tention by adjusting the screw on the bobbin case but it is still missing stitches. I think I will spring fror a new bobbin case tto see if theis helps and find a place to get it serviced too.

    I I have a 1936 singer sewing machine that seems to work good but I need to find some parts to it to sew with it. Every time I have extra money I seem to lose my money buying patterns and fabric. 😉

    Sharon

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Robin is right: it sounds like a timing issue. Essentially that means that the bobbin isn’t cycling around at exactly the right time so it meets up with the needle. It’s a good idea to have your machine serviced about once a year anyway (says the woman who hasn’t had her machine serviced in almost three years–but that’s because I’d have to carry it on the subway!), and the technician can adjust this for you. You’ll be so happy you had it done. I’ve had machines that didn’t work at all until the timing was adjusted and then sewed like a dream afterward.

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Machine technicians won’t share all their secrets with you or they’ll be out of business but I agree with the timing being a strong possibility.

    Sounds like your case is critical, I’d take it to emergency. She’s a middle aged girl she may need her “blood pressure” checked lol!

    You have my sympathies Sharon. Being without your trusty sidekick can be really frustrating.

    Liesel, couldn’t they come to you instead?

    You know I really wish they had courses on how to service your own machine and then we wouldn’t have to do the most outrageous things in order to get our machines serviced (like ride the subway with the machine or drive nearly 500km to the nearest technician).

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    thejennigirl @thejennigirl

    I service mine myself. I found an OSMG (old sewing machine guy) to be my mentor. Right now, I’m replacing the tension knob on a black 301A Singer, and it’s taking all my patience not to throw the new tension accross the room. He’s been sweet enough to explain how to attatch it and calibrate it 3 or 4 times now, and I’m sure he’ll be patent again on Monday when I call, whining, LOL!

    It’s a perk of an older machine. They are so simple and just need grease or oil and a bit of patience.

    *chants in a soft voice, Vintage is the way to go! Vintage is the way to go!*

    😉

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Oh how funny you are lol! Such humour.

    I have a “new fangled contraption” so diy servicing is a no go for me because I wouldn’t know where to start. It has taken a long time to find someone I can trust as my last machine was so called serviced but never worked well when it came home again. You are very lucky to be able to learn as I don’t think there is anyone here that would teach and like piano tuners they seem to be dying out.

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    I have had my machine for about eight years and have never had it serviced. Yeesh. Is it going to just crack open and leave me stranded on the side of the freeway?

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Mine is quite old and second hand-not new and flash and electronic.

    Jed blows mine out with the air compressor every few months and I drop some oil on the tip of the bobbin mount after each project.

    My sewing guru says that maintenance can delay the need to service.

    However,Sharon’s does sound a bit sick.

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    Mama_Knowles @Mama_Knowles

    I look at getting mine sewing machine serviced and it will cost me $70 plus the bobbin case will be about $20, and that’s if there insint anything else wrong. To top it off the place is over an hour away and will take a week to get it fix. I new one will cost me $200 (about the same as the one I have right now and it has worked wonderful all these years intil now) but we really don’t have the money for either right now. I feel like I have lost my best frind right now, what to do….

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    Tamara @justsewit

    Is there someone you could borrow a machine from to get your projects completed? Just while you save up? This is the only solution I could think of other than borrowing the $$ and I’m guessing this wouldn’t be your number one choice (well it wouldn’t be mine anyway).

    Are there any machine sales on at the moment in your end of the world? Could you put one on a pay off type plan – layby?

    I do understand how desperate this is for you – had something similar happen with my first machine (I was right in the middle of sewing a very important project and it decided to die) but then my darling hubby came through and said I could have an early birthday present….. could this be a solution???

    I’m keeping my fingers (and toes) crossed for you.

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    Mama_Knowles @Mama_Knowles

    Oh thank you! I am trying to talk my dad into fixing mine or buying me a new one. He is is a farmer, hunter, lets do it ourselfs kinda guy and loves it that I have been sewing and making the children clothes. He and my mom bought my sewing machine for me when I was 16. He knows how much I use it, all my little girls clothes I have made, nothing bought other than shoes and socks. So this is my agurement to my hubby. hehehe(eveil laugh) If I don’t get mine fixed or a new one he has to buy Sweat pea’s clothes for this fall and winter. Maybe I can get the two of them to go in together and buy one.

    Keeping my fingures crossed!!!

    Sharon

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    Mama_Knowles @Mama_Knowles

    YAHH!!!! I am getting a new sewing machine!! Can you tell I am excited?!?

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