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Pattern layout

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    Profile photo of ClaireClaire @Claire123

    I’m struggling to understand which way up to have my pattern on the fabric. Should I put the pattern on the wrong or right side of the fabric ?

    Profile photo of MaríaMaría @mariajsanroman

    Claire, I’ve seen in other patterns that you should fold your fabric right sides together for double thickness, right side up for single thickness.
    Hope it helps!
    It is a great pattern. So easy, and such a good final result!

    Profile photo of miss_sonjamiss_sonja @miss_sonja

    The layout diagram should tell you which way, but usually, fold right sides together, thus lay pattern pieces right side up on the wrong side of the fabric.

    I’ve got a pair of these ready to sew, waiting by my machine.

    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    Hi @claire123 may I ask, are you working with a print or solid fabric? If a print, is the design going in one direction at all?

    All these little details help to make the best choice for laying out your pattern.

    The ladies above have given very sound advice. Generally, you fold your fabric in half so the two grainlines (the woven edges often consisting of dots) meet. You will know if your fabric is not really on grain if the folded part bubbles, so it may (depending on your fabric and how it was cut) take a little bit of working with it to get it sitting right.

    Then, depending on the direction of your print (for plain fabrics and non directional prints it doesn’t matter) you layout your pattern according to the instructions. As you become more experienced, you can play with the layout because after all it is a guide. Then pin or use pattern weights to stabilise the pieces before cutting them out.

    I hope this helps and gets you sewing these cute little shorts in no time.


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