Oliver + S

On using a serger……

Viewing 5 posts - 16 through 20 (of 20 total)
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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    I was thrown by that too Sarvi. I’ve taken to measuring the seam distance from the needle I’m using (can vary for three or four thread overlockingr so I guess that’s why there’s no set distances on the machine) then noting what that lines up with on the machine.

    Ther are some marks on my machine but they measure how much is being cut off by the blade and they’re big numbers. I can’t imagine when I’ll ever want to slice a full inch off beyond the width of the seam itself!

    I’ve started using mine to finish seam allowances before constructing the garment and I love doing this as finishing them once sewn bugs me no end. Also using it for all knit sewing and loving it.

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    Mine has distances marked on the top of the looper cover, front as flap that drops down, as distances from both right and left needle, one line is solid and the other is dotted. If no markings measure and find something to line up against.

    If you bought it from a dealer and they have lessons take them if possible, I didn’t realise that my dealer had lessons until recently but I am going to take them over 2 years after buying my machine, although I have been using an overlocker for 20years I am sure I will learn something new!

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    wendy @wendyls

    I do the same as Lightning; I find a point on my machine to use as a guide. One of those re-positional vinyl seam guides could be handy, though. 🙂

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    wendy @wendyls

    Oh, scratch that! I just looked at my serger and realized there isn’t anywhere to place a repositional seam guide!

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    Jess M. @mommy2maria

    You ladies have inspired me to be a bit more aggressive with my machine, and learn some fancy things! I also have the 1034D!

Viewing 5 posts - 16 through 20 (of 20 total)

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