Oliver + S

Lining skirt??

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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    cjarret @cjarret

    Hello! I absolutely adore this dress & am planning to use it for my daughter’s 3rd birthday in July. I made a “draft” of it using scrap fabric I had and got SEVERAL comments on how cute it was. The only think I don’t like about it, though, is all the visible seams on the inside of the skirt…

    Would it be possible to line the skirt as well as the bodice? I’m relatively new to sewing clothes so I’m still trying to figure out this stuff on my own!!

    Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

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    April Henry @April1930s

    I’ll let Liesl answer the lining question, but I am curious if you have a serger? If not, then french seams could be an option for a ‘prettier’ inside look. I assume you topstitched all the seams – if you serge or overcast (zigzag) the seams and then press them to one side, when you topstitch it will keep the seam set in place.

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    cjarret @cjarret

    I was going to serge the seams, but I was afraid that would keep the skirt from doing it’s flare thing (since I wouldn’t be able to snip them). Maybe it wouldn’t be a big deal if I didn’t..? I suppose I should try another draft with either lining or serged seams & see how it comes out!?

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    cjarret @cjarret

    Oh, and I didn’t topstitch the seams on the skirt portion – didn’t know I was supposed to. Wouldn’t that look kind of odd having 2 seams for each of the 6 panels? I honestly don’t know! 🙂

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    April Henry @April1930s

    Yes, you can still clip the curve after you serge – it doesn’t hurt it at all. Here is a photo (which should take you to the other photos of the same dress that might be easier to see more detailing).

    Tea Party Dress - Hem Flair

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    cjarret @cjarret

    April – Thanks for these pictures! You replied to my post with my draft version of this dress over on Sewing Mamas! 🙂 I LOVE your version here; so cute! Did you just use large ricrac for the trim? I was thinking of doing that, but wasn’t sure how it would look. I love it!

    I also see what you mean about top stitching – looks great. And if clipping the seams won’t hurt if it’s serged, I’ll definitely try that! I just assumed that the dress would unravel if I cut the serged seam. 🙂 Sorry, I’m still pretty new to sewing!

    Thank you for posting these pics – they were a great help!

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    April Henry @April1930s

    The rick rack was just average-sized. I used cotton vintage so I had to pre-wash/dry hot to pre-shrink. If you’re using new rick rack, most of it from JoAnn’s and the like are poly and you won’t have to worry about that. Use a laundry bag to wash/dry if the rick rack you have is cotton.

    I’ve clipped the curves in two different ways and either one has worked fine (not sure what the technical/professional way of doing it would be, however). One way is to clip the curves after you serge. My preferred way is to clip them prior to serging.

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    cjarret @cjarret

    Ah, clipping BEFORE serging… genius. 🙂 This is why I ask questions! 🙂

    I’ll definitely have to remember to wash my trim first! I wouldn’t have even thought about that.

    Thanks!!

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    Lizabeth @Lizabeth

    I am stymied trying to think of how one would clip curves after serging… wouldn’t the clipping snip the overcast loops and your serging stitches would ravel?? So how does one clip after one has serged?

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    April Henry @April1930s

    I have just clipped… the stitching of the seam is what is most important. There may be a straggler or two of threads, but not enough that I have ever had an issue with – even after washing. Besides, you finish with topstitching anyway, so it will hold everything place.

    All that to say, I still prefer to clip prior to serging.

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    KarenK @KarenK

    I haven’t clipped them at all, ever. I just sew, serge, topstitch. The nice hem binding helps the skirt do that cute little flare as well, I think.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

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