Oliver + S

knitted fabrics

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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    madebymum @madebymum

    Hi I have only sewn with cottons and denim so far but would like to try using some cotton knit fabrics for the sailboat top. So I am looking for all your tips and suggestions on how to tackle it. Thanks

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    We just made a Sailboat Top from our new interlock fabric to be displayed it at Quilt Market, which starts tomorrow. You don’t really need to make many changes to the pattern to make if from knits. Use a very small zigzag stitch instead of a straight stitch, because the zigzag stitch is stretchy and won’t break when the fabric is stretched.

    Here are a few other tips for sewing with knits that I’ve written up specifically for our interlock but which would apply to many other knit fabrics as well:

    Interlock has lots of stretch in the width, but not much stretch in the length.

    Be sure to wash and dry your fabric beforehand, since interlock shrinks quite a bit.

    Most sewing patterns for knit fabrics include a 1/4” seam allowance.

    Needle and thread:

    *Use a universal needle or a ball-point needle

    Thread:

    *Use all-purpose, polyester, or poly/cotton thread

    Using a standard sewing machine:

    *Use a straight-stitch, roller, or zigzag foot, and sew all seams with a stretch stitch (some machines have special stitches specifically designed for sewing knits) or with a narrow, shortened zigzag stitch, approximately 1/16” wide by 16 stitches (8 zigs and 8 zags) per inch. Lessen the pressure on the presser foot to prevent the fabric from stretching, or use a walking foot. Finish the seam allowances together, stitching over the raw edges with a regular zigzag stitch to finish them.

    Using a serger:

    *A serger will stitch, trim the seam allowances, and finish the seam allowances all at the same time. A three- or four-thread overlock stitch is suitable for most purposes. *When sewing apparel, baste the seams first, if necessary, to check fit before stitching. *Be sure to guide the fabric so only the 1/4” seam allowance is used as you stitch. Press seam allowances to one side unless otherwise instructed.

    Hems:

    *Hems can be topstitched or blind hemmed. Topstitch with a narrow zigzag and a shortened stitch length, or use the cover hem on the serger machine. Blind hem using the machine blindstitch in the same way you might blindstitch a woven hem.

    *For a fun hem alternative, try a lettuce-edge hem by satin stitching over the raw edge of the fabric with a very short zigzag stitch, stretching the fabric as you sew. This will create a wavy hem.

    I hope that helps, and I’d love to see what you make!

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    janimal @janimal

    I have a tip for working with knits! After you cut the pattern pieces, iron them with spray starch a couple times. Makes them SO much easier to work with. Ironing can stretch them out a bit so you may have to recut a bit after pressing them.

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    Nicole @motherof5

    Hi, another tip given to me by a clothing manufacturer , is after pre-washing and pressing , lay out your fabric and let it sit before cutting. The longer the better, over night for a ‘woolly’ knit. This allows the knit to reshape. It really works!

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    lattemama @lattemama

    Liesl wrote:

    Most sewing patterns for knit fabrics include a 1/4” seam allowance.

    Does that mean I should treat the 1/2″ seam allowance on your patterns as a 1/4″ seam allowance? or do I still sew with a 1/2″ even if I’m using knits?

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    Nicole @motherof5

    I would think if the seam allowance states 1/2 inch, thats what you do. Many patterns ,such as kwik-sew,which are designed for only knit fabrics have a standard 1/4 inch allowance( an average overlocking stitch)I think that may be what Liesl is referring to.

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Use whatever seam allowance the pattern calls for. If it’s 1/2″ (like our patterns, you can either leave it or trim down the extra once you’ve sewn. I prefer to trim. Our upcoming fall patterns for knit interlock will have 1/4″ seam allowances.

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    sahmcolorado @sahmcolorado

    I’m so excited for the Fall patterns with knits!!

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    sayiamyou @maraya

    Me too!! Especially since I saw a post recently about Patty Young knits. But, SewBaby has some that I’m in love with too.

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    sahmcolorado @sahmcolorado

    I recently read a blog tutorial about working with knits and the author suggested that you “paint” the edges of the fabric with liquid stabilizer prior to sewing on a regular sewing machine so that it won’t stretch out of shape. Has anyone every heard of or tried this method?

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

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