Oliver + S

Internal closures for Sunday Brunch?

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    roundtheworldgirl @roundtheworldgirl

    So I’m almost done with my jacket and as I was looking through my button collection (and considering fabric-covered buttons), I decided I really don’t want to do buttons at all. I made a large rosette out of the same velveteen that the jacket is made of and plan to attach it where the buttons go. But then there is the problem of how to fasten the jacket.

    Right now I’m thinking hook-and-eye closures where the two buttons closest to the edge would go, and then maybe two internal buttons to hold the whole thing closed (buttons sewn to the front facing and buttonholes on the part of the jacket that would normally have the buttons). I’m not sure I’m describing this well. But do you think this would be too annoying to get on a toddler? I’d just do the two hook-and-eye closures but I don’t think the jacket would stay closed very well.

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    juliamom2009 @juliamom2009

    I made a lined Sunday Brunch jacket last year from denim and the jacket was quite heavy for buttonholes, so I used the magnetic snaps that people use to make purses (kind of pricey) and sewed the decorative buttons to the top layer of the jacket. My daughter loved that the jacket would magnetically snap shut….very cool to a 2 year old!

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Yes, those are a good idea. Just remember that you need to reinforce them well, so it may mot work if youre beyond that point in the construction. Otherwise, you could just use regular sew in snaps. I don’t think hook and eye would stay closed either. And anyway,buttoning all four of those buttons is a pain on a toddler actually. I plan to try some different next time too. Andy machine won’t do buttonholes on this pattern, so I have to do them manually or come up with another plan. The rosette sounds lovely!

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