Oliver + S

Ice Cream Dress View B: Fabric Requirements

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
  • LINK
    cybele727 @cybele727

    Hi,

    I am wondering if anyone has any experience with view B. I plan on making a dress using colors so that I have a candy corn dress. When you look at the fabric guide, it says View B, Fabric A, B, and C, yet the fabric guide doesn’t label the picture of the dress for which fabric requirements would be the A, the B, and the C. That is, View B, Fabric A at 3T ia 3/4 yds. Is Fabric A for the bottom panel, the middle panel, the top panel or the yoke. And because the way I view the dress, there could be as many as 4 fabrics (one for each panel and a fourth for the yoke.)

    So, would someone help a confuddled sewer?

    Thanks

    Jenny

    LINK
    Jane @jesims

    I had the exact same idea. Great minds think alike. I ordered 1/2 yard of each color (I’m making a 2T).. Can’t wait to see your finished project!

    LINK
    cybele727 @cybele727

    How are you distributing the color?

    Yellow on the bottom, orange in the middle, and then what? If you do the top and the yoke white that will be too much white. Since on candy corn, the white tip is only the tip. I thought about doing two different colors of orange with only the yoke white? Or are you doing the two sections the same color orange?

    When I do it, I will post in the flickr account!

    LINK
    Jane @jesims

    I just looked at the pattern. I”m going to do Dress A for my candy corn dress. So I actually need more fabric (maybe). For a 3T fabric requirements are as follows.

    View A / Fabric A – 1 yard

    View A / Fabric B – 3/4 yard

    Dress is put together as:

    A

    B

    A

    View B / Fabric A – 3/4 yard

    View B / Fabric B – 1/2 yard

    View B / Fabric C – 1/4 yard

    Dress is put together as

    A

    B

    C

    A

    Does that make sense?

    Jane

    LINK
    Jane @jesims

    I was going to do view A and do it as:

    White (yoke)

    Orange (middle)

    Yellow (bottom)

    I was trying to decide if I should go with straight Kona Cotton or something with a tiny print (maybe polka dots) so it wasn’t so harsh.

    It’s so funny you posted this, I was just showing it to my husband this morning and we were talking about design ideas for the best look.

    LINK
    cybele727 @cybele727

    Jane,

    First, thank you. Totally makes sense. And doing view A, with as you have suggested is brilliant. It has the correct proportions. The only reason I initially chose B, was to not do pockets, but I can leave those off if I do A. I thought about trying to create pumpkins for the pockets, but then it would be so strongly thematic, that it could only be worn in Sept and October. I might sew a band of ribbon, (if I find the right one and it speaks to me) at the fabric transitions.

    I also think it is funny that you were discussing this with your husband. When I am stymied, I often turn to him and say, so which fabric do you like for this pattern, or which fabric do you like to coordinate with this fabric on this pattern. He’s a very patient man!

    I was going to go with a straight Kona cotton, because I think that if you get a warm yellow and orange, it wouldn’t be too harsh. Although a super sweet orange with small white pindots might be really cute.

    Jenny

    LINK
    cybele727 @cybele727
    LINK
    Jane @jesims

    Jenny,

    Those are cute. Do you think the “idea” of a candy corn dress would be lost because of the print though?

    When are you planning to make yours? I was going to wait a few weeks yet (I’ve still got some other things on my to do list). I can always bump the stuff on the to-do list though. 😉

    Jane

    LINK
    sarahb @sarahb

    That will be so cute! I made a candy corn dress a couple years ago and just used Kona cottons. (I think I must not have had the Ice Cream pattern at that point!) I’m hoping maybe my younger daughter will be willing to wear it this year, and I will redo the hat since I didn’t like how it turned out before. Here’s a pic so you can see what the solids look like together in a dress. http://www.flickr.com/photos/_sarah_b_/5144527944/in/set-72157623095618140

    LINK
    Jane @jesims

    Sarah,

    Your daughter looked so happy with her costume! Thanks for sharing that photo. I was afraid it might be too much orange but now I don’t think so.

    Jane

    LINK
    cybele727 @cybele727

    Sarah, that is very cute!!

    LINK
    cybele727 @cybele727

    Jane,

    I will probably make mine some time in the next two weeks. I don’t have anything in the hopper. I sew when the fabric and pattern call out to me… “me, me make me. Use this. Make me. I want to be!”. Lol

    Jenny

    LINK
    Jennifer1568 @Jennifer1568

    I think Kaffe shot cotton look really nice when solid colors are used for this dress. The shot cottons have depth because of the way they are woven. I think the colors are beautiful. I love this dress. I want to make one like it. http://probablyactually.wordpress.com/2012/03/12/lilas-birthday-dress/ There are others made from linen and shot cotton in Flicker.

    LINK
    cybele727 @cybele727

    I like the look of shot cotton, but not for the candy corn look. The shot is beautiful but absorbs much light based on the pics I have seen. Candy corn has a waxy sheen, so to achieve the effect, the fabric must be a touch polished to reflect light.

    However, let me say, your dress is gorgeous and I want to make it in shot cotton gor another project.

    LINK
    Jane @jesims

    Jenny,

    I was really considering the shot cotton now. I hadn’t thought of it before. I really like the depth it gives. Maybe a trip to the fabric store is in order for a touch/feel/see session.

    Jane

    P.S. I love working through the design process like this with other sew-ers. I may have to post more design questions in the future. 🙂

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

copyright

Unless otherwise credited, all work on this blog is © Liesl + Co., Inc, 2008-2018. You are welcome to link to this blog, but please ask permission before using any text or images.