Oliver + S

How do I add more room in the shoulder/ arm?

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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    Profile photo of SarahGreenSarahGreen @moonglowmama

    I made the sleepover pajamas for my son 6 months ago and am about to do another pair. He is a slim guy, but, alas, 6 months of growth means that the little bit snug really must be dealt with for this next pair.

    One problem is that I cut the fabric for both pairs at the same time. I have just enough to re-cut the sleeves, if that is the best option top increase the shoulder and upper arm area.

    I have considered adding in a strip about 3″ along the sides of the back piece and the same on the sleeve seam, but the curve of the sleeve and the cuff portion are concerning me. Not sure that will give him the room he needs, or that I won’t make some new, worse problem!

    What would you do? What other options do I have?

    Here is the flickr pic from the first set. He is pulling down on the shoulder area, because his hands are in his pockets, but I think you can see what I’m talking about.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/75426390@N06/11810932275/

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    Profile photo of SarahGreenSarahGreen @moonglowmama

    Hmmm…. I just had another thought; maybe I could make a kind of back yoke, similar to what is on a mens shirt, which would give more width? Obviously need to make the neck facing piece longer to do so, but maybe the fronts wouldn’t match up then?

    Ugh. Wish I had more pattern know-how. And fabric.

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    Hmmm, not an easy fix, but how about splitting the centre back, adding a few inches, and then tucking it in (Like an action back). If you fold correctly you will still be able to use the original neck facing. This will give you ease but I am concerned it may be uncomfortable to sleep on?

    I will keep thinking about it.

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    Profile photo of SarahGreenSarahGreen @moonglowmama

    Well, one good thing is that he doesn’t sleep in them, except if we are with family or friends. It’s more so that he has something to put on after a shower, other than a robe. Teenagers! 🙂

    When I had him try on his old shirt for me again today, I noticed that the entire arm is a bit tight, especially in the elbow- not much ease there.

    So, maybe I could recut the sleeve piece wider and add in a piece to the side seam to match the added width for the armhole? The geometry in my brain makes me think it’s not just a matter of widening the sleeve, though?

    Thanks for lending your brains, Nicole!

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    Profile photo of jay_1965vwjay_1965vw @jay_1965vw

    I would do an inverted pleat like Nicole suggested, and add some extra width to the sleeve in the centre, by slashing and opening the pattern. To make the armhole match the new sleeve head, drop the armhole half the amount you added to the sleeve. Does that make sense?

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    Profile photo of SarahGreenSarahGreen @moonglowmama

    I understand the inverted pleat, and slashing the sleeve to add width. Not sure about “drop the armhole.” I think that would mean to increase somewhat the size of the armhole surface area, by cutting away some of it. I think I would measure from the top of the side seam down an amount half of what i need to add and then blend from that point up into the original line.

    Does that sound like what you are talking about?

    I really appreciate your help!

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    Profile photo of jay_1965vwjay_1965vw @jay_1965vw

    I think you have the idea. The easiest way would be to trace off the curve at the bottom of the armhole, measure down the side seam half of the width you added to the centre of the sleeve, then redraw the bottom of the armhole back from the one you traced (or retrace off the original pattern).

    I hope that is clearer. I tried to draw you a picture, but I can’t get it onto my computer at the moment!

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    Profile photo of SarahGreenSarahGreen @moonglowmama

    I think I understand. I am feeling confident enough to try it out this weekend. Will update with a photo!

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