Oliver + S

Grading for the All Day Shirt

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    James @James

    I would love to make an adjustment to the All Day shirt for a better fit for my body. Ideally, I would use the “large” yoke with the “x-large” body parts. My shoulders are not very broad–at least I’d rather say that than to say that I have slightly too much girth in my torso for my frame. Is there a simple way of making this adjustment? I’m imagining I would probably have to adjust the sleeve cap as well? Grateful for any suggestions. Thanks!

    • This topic was modified 3 weeks ago by James.
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    Masha Richart
    Moderator
    @roundtheworldgirl

    If it’s just the shoulder width you want to change, I’d probably try a narrow shoulder adjustment on the size x-large yoke to get to to the width you need. Then you don’t have to mess with trying to get it to match up to the x-large body parts.

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Agreed, or you could go the reverse route and start with the large pattern and use the Fit for Real People book to help you adjust the body of the shirt to a larger size. To me that seems like the easier route, but either way would work.

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    James @James

    Thanks so much for these suggestions. I’m interested in your recommendation for Fit for Real People. That title has come up several times lately, so it’s definitely something I need to check out. I have cut out the pieces, mostly in the XL, and figured it would be easier to take away than to add. Yesterday I got the pieces cut out and got have joined the fronts, yoke and back. I think it may fit pretty well just the way it is. Just watched you video on bias binding. I bought some silk organza to finish the seams with a Hong Kong finish. If I’m brave enough. I’m making the shirt with a lovely white cotton shirting with a black lace overlay. I’m fairly pleased with the way it’s going.

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