Oliver + S

Fitting the sleeves – Muslin 5 questions

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • LINK
    Nirmala D @NirmalaD

    #1. If I am starting from a size to fit my upper bust measurement and grading to larger size for waist and hips ( say size 6 D cup going to a 12 for waist and hips) and doing a full arm adjustment to add about 1.5 inches, do I need to adjust the armhole also? Or should I start with the armhole as is in the smaller size?

    #2 Would the Bistro dress pattern be a good one to use to make a “body map” in muslin as described in Fit for Real People?

    LINK
    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    For question 1 it very much depends on your arms. If you have fuller arms you may want to go with a larger size armhole. Otherwise start with the standard size and see how it goes with the muslin.

    Regarding #2, I’m not a big believer in the body map concept because it’s not nearly as simple as the authors of the book try to make it. Each pattern will be different and will include a different amount of ease, etc., so even if you make a base pattern fit perfectly it won’t be directly applicable to most other patterns. In theory it’s a great idea, but I know people who have taken classes for this and it hasn’t worked out nearly as well as it sounds. The Bistro Dress would be a good pattern to use, but use it for fit practice and recognize that the changes you make won’t be universal to all patterns. Does that make sense?

    LINK
    Nirmala D @NirmalaD

    Thank you, Liesl. I do understand what you mean about the body map. Could you or one of the advisors take a look at the muslin fit so far and tell me what you see. I have been trying but not sure what I am seeing. This is Muslin #4 (size 8 D, grading to 14 at waist. There is no FBA as it seems to have ease now in chest. I did a full arm adjustment of 1.5 inches to the sleeve. That is all so far

    LINK
    Nirmala D @NirmalaD
Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

copyright

Unless otherwise credited, all work on this blog is © Liesl + Co., Inc, 2008-2020. You are welcome to link to this blog, but please ask permission before using any text or images.