Oliver + S

Fitting Hollywood Trousers

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    Elizabeth Louros @elizabeth256

    I made one pair of Hollywood Trousers and love them but they are a little tight in the crotch. Should I lengthen the rise ? If so, by how much ?

    Thanks

    LINK
    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    You can lengthen and shorten the rise and the lengthen/shorten line on the pattern piece. Tough to say how much to add–you could either measure another pair of trousers or measure your rise and add 1″ and see how that goes. You can also sew the rise longer by scooping it more in the rise as you sew, and that would be a way to alter the pair you just finished. But in general it’s better to make adjustments to the pattern itself beforehand.

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    Margi @margi

    Hi Liesl, love made a few of your patterns. I love the classic shirt pattern. I’m always looking for the”perfect” pants pattern. So want to try the Hollywood Trousers. Can pleats/darts be added to front of trousers? I have a flat butt,short crotch, straight hips and big belly. I can get back to fit and hang right but not the front. When I cut out a bigger size for the front or widen the seams I get a jodhpur look and front legs are huge and don’t hang right. I’ve had better luck with pants with pleats because I am spreading out increase to waist in 6 places. 4 pleats and both side seams. I then make pleats/darts smaller. I’m not sure I’m describing this properly but it would be sort of adding “reverse” darts. Or is there another way to add fabric for just the protruding abdomen without messing up the way the leg fits and the way the pants hang? Thank you.
    Margi

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Of course! Any changes like this will be best made in muslin first, of course. You could certainly add room and then use a pleat to close it back up.

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)

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