Oliver + S

Fabric weight for messenger bag

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    I want to make a slightly floppy bag that can be scrunched up to fit into a small bin at school … I was going to use a sturdy ish quilting cotton for the lining and echino for the outside … It’s lighter than home dec but heavier than, say, city weekend. Too floppy, do you think? Should I interface it all?

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    My two have been super stiff. The second one used fabrics similar to what you’re describing and I put a layer of Pellon interfacing (the one that could cut you with the raw edge) so that it wouldn’t scrunch. It might be just the way you want it with only a light interfacing like you’d use for a shirt collar added. I’d probably err on the side of adding something, otherwise the bag has no shape at all when carried

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Ok, great to know, thank you!

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I’ve made one from a thickish drill like fabric with an old pillow case for the lining, see below. The resulting bag holds its shape, just, but is folppy/soft enough to be foded up and stashed inside another bage for plane trips. I proably wouldn’t interface the bag to keep the floppy qualities.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/73669617@N07/8246902230/

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Great, graphic bag!

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    with love Heidi @with love Heidi

    Thanks Sarvi!

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    sayiamyou @maraya

    Sarvi the one I made is probably what you’re going for. I used a quilting cotton to line, canvas from Chris’ as the interfacing and FFA for the exterior. Sturdy enough without being stiff and unwieldy.

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Yes, that sounds just right — I was going to skip the interfacing but it sounds like it would just puddle rather than scrunch. Thanks so much ladies!

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

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