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Coverstitch Machine?

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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    Profile photo of Jess M.Jess M. @mommy2maria

    So I am lusting after a coverstitch machine. (In case its different in Aus, I mean the twin needle hems you see on RTW tshirts) I already have a serger so it doesn’t necessarily need serging features.

    I am eyeballing the Janome 1000cpx due to price, reviews etc, but wondered if there are others I should be open to?

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    Profile photo of TinekeTineke @Tineke

    Hi,

    I had a Janome CPX 1000 before, for 4 years. But it was a pain to use. Lot of skipped stitches, unable to sew over a seam, unable to sew in slippery fabrics, or to stretchy, etc.
    I had the opportunity to try the Babylock coverstitch. It was a charm to use. I sold the Janome and bought a Babylock. I never regretted that decision.
    Tineke

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    Profile photo of sayiamyousayiamyou @maraya

    I bought a Babylock Diana after so many rave reviews about the Babylock brand (my sewing machine is a Bernina). The Diana is a serger/coverstitch in one and I love it. Transitioning from one function to the other is not difficult or time consuming. I’ve sewn on the Babylock coverstitch at my local shop and it was very nice too. I went with the combo because I didn’t already have a serger and do not have space for 3 machines. If there’s a dealer near you I recommend going to test drive.

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    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    I have a janome (but then all my machines are Janome). Unfortunately I don’t use it enough because of the size of my sewing table (it has to be squished up the back until I need it). There is a trick to getting the threads out so they don’t unravel but it is easy to master. I haven’t had an issue so far. This one you can do one two or three needles at a time and there are guides that screw in so you can get the position just right. I would suggest going and asking to test drive each of the machines to see which suits you the best. It isn’t necessarily the right thing to just go with a brand because it may not be right for you on that particular model – although having said that, I find it very easy to take all my machines in at the one time to be serviced at just one place.

    Good luck, I hope you find your perfect coverstitch machine.

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I got a Janome Cpx1000. I use it on most of my sewing projects.I really like the space to the right hand side of the needle. It allows me to easily top stitch seams. I also find it useful to do double rows of top sitting on wovens to give nice even top stitching.
    I would recommend getting some woolly nylon thread for the looper when doing him as this give extra stretch and prevents poped stitches.I really enjoy using my coverstitch and would recommend one.

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    Profile photo of cybele727cybele727 @cybele727

    So I will ask dumb questions like this: can’t you just use a twin needle on a regular machine? Does this do something special???

    What is the benefit on a separate machine?

    Educate me, ladies!! Give me a reason to get another machine! 😉

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    Profile photo of Jess M.Jess M. @mommy2maria

    You can do all that on a regular machine—for the most part. It does look a bit different though. I have never been happy with the way mine looked using my machines (and I highly suspect it’s my machines themselves….they are old and I’m due for an upgrade). I didn’t want to spend money on a high end serger w/ both options until I knew I would use my serger on a regular basis. I do. I am sure at some point I will upgrade my serger later on. I guess I could sell my serger and get a combo serger/coverstitch. But I’m also ok having separate machines since I have the space.

    The only real benefit (that I am aware of) to having separate machines is you don’t have to switch back and forth between the settings. I imagine it’s a lot like setting up between embroidery and sewing on combo units—which I Have and it’s a pain in my bum! HAHA!

    I also want to branch out into different brands.

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I love the separate machines. It would really annoy me to switch back and forth and I wouldn’t use the coverstitch as much. As well as my regular overlocker I also have one set up exclusively for rolled hem. I’m definitely in the dedicated machine for the job 🙂

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    Profile photo of Cindy HamptonCindy Hampton @Cindy

    Bernina makes a great cover stitch machine. The L220. I have one and love it, sews like a dream.

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    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    Separate machines would mean being able to use the other if one of them needs repairs. Having a combo means having to replace the whole thing if it went dicky.

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    Profile photo of Nora CrossNora Cross @purplevann1

    I am trying to find someone who knows the difference between the janome coverpro 900 and the 1000, other than $400!! I know the 1000 can use up to 3 needles, and the 900 only 2, and the 1000 has something called a seam tightening system, and I don’t know what that is, so don’t know if I need it. I only want to hem t-shirts. Nothing fancy. Locally, they only sell the 1000.

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    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    I would pop onto the Janome website and call both models up. They will have a complete list of features on both (which you seem well adversed in anyway). Then I would go and talk to the local dealer and ask what the tightening system feature means and the various other things that might be confusing.

    I am not near mine and can’t remember the model name but it has got three needles and pictures on the side to give an indication of what they could be used for. If this is any help.

    I’m sorry I can’t help further. But that is what I would do to find out.

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    Profile photo of Lightning McStitchLightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    @purplevann1 if you really only want to hem t-shirts then my suggestion is to get familiar with a twin needle and woolly nylon. It will be almost free compared to coverstitch, dead easy to change thread colour and saves having to store another machine.
    Or buy yourself something shiny 🙂

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