Oliver + S

adding growth room to fairy tale

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    meleliza @meleliza

    I’m considering making this a size up so that it can be worn next year too. However, the waist is a smidge low, so in a larger size it will look like a dropped waist. I thought of adding a tuck around the waist seam and possibly covering it with a sash that goes al the way around. Any thoughts?

    I’m inspired by this dress that uses tucks as a design element: http://www.etsy.com/listing/103325662/liberty-tana-lawn-dress-with-matching. Of course, it uses a button back.

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    needlewoman @needlewoman

    Just accessed the link you provided, Meleliza, and the dress is very sweet. Even if it does come with underwear, $95 is rather a lot. I shudder to think what it would cost in AUS $. I think the tucks are a great idea; can you move them up the bodice so that they are a feature rather than something to be hidden? Given the trouble you’ve gone to get the Liberty, getting as much wear out of it as possible sounds like a plan! Thanks for the tip abt the Playdate dress in your recent postings; I have that pattern and am attracted to it for autumn clothes next year. Many years ago I made some stretch outfits for my nieces, and the head openings were a problem. My sister in law who is a more versatile sewist than me had to open the shoulder for buttons. I should have guessed as the child’s father, like me has a big head from front to back. Makes store bought hats useless for decent fit. Anyway, since then I’ve always been a little paranoid abt openings. I made a back placket opening for the Ice Cream dress in owls/stripes to pre-empt any problems.

    Good luck.

    Fiona

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Looking more closely at the pattern, I noticed that the body measurements for sizes 2 and 3 are the same. So to keep things simple I’m sticking with size two, which I already muslined for her, and making the skirt in a 3T length. Perhaps I’ll turn the hem up further and let it out next year if it still fits. I may skip the front darts to leave a little extra room, though I suspect she’ll loose that delicious belly by this time next year.

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    needlewoman @needlewoman

    That’s very canny, Mel. I just looked at the photo of your fabrics for the dress, they are just beautiful! I’m intrigued by the silk/cotton sateen. Is it easy to sew with – i.e. not too slippery. I like Robert Kaufman’s stuff too; is this material part of his quilting ranges or dressmaking materials? Take care of yourself as you work towards Xmas – you don’t want a relapse. Can’t wait to see it made up.

    Fiona

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    Sherry @mim22

    Recently made a “princess ” dress up and did 3 large pin tucks around the hem about 3inches above the hem, so we can let it down as she grows, would something like that work. Hope you are keeping well, don’t want mama sick at this time of year.

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    meleliza @meleliza

    Thanks! mim, I’m doing my best.

    The radience silk cotton is nothing like quilting fabric. It has a wonderful drape and hand with a lovely silk sheen. It’s not as fluid as charmuese, but you can wash and iron it like cotton. I have a blouse from

    Anthropologie that’s a silk cotton blend, so when I discovered this stuff I went mad. I made a Fariy

    Tale dress with a pink sash out of this for another little girl, I made my baby’s Tinkerbell dress out of it and now the sash for her Christmas dress. It is easy to work with, just a little slippery like the designer cotton voiles. If I have time left, I’m going to make myself a Christmas blouse out of it too.

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