Oliver + S

Heirloom Sewing and Embroidery

Using Tucks in O+S Patterns

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)
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    Profile photo of Frances SuzanneFrances Suzanne @Frances Suzanne

    Hi all! We’ve got an upcoming post over on the O+S blog about using the “heirloom technique” of tucks in Oliver and S Patterns. Not the ones that already have them….like the Family Reunion or Music Class…but thinking out of the box a bit more. Anyway, we’ve selected 2 O+S patterns to incorporate tucks within. QUESTION: Which patterns would you like to see with some additional tucks? Do you have any ideas on how to incorporate tucks within a tried and true O+S pattern? What type of tucks would you use on “said pattern”? We’d love to hear some of your ideas as we continue to sew our two looks!!

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    Profile photo of DebDeb @Mynorth

    Whenever possible, I use the tucked hem method on O+S patterns. On occasion, I’ve made 2 tucks on the hem and added embroidery on one of the tucks.

    I’d like to see pin tucks on the Lullaby (onesie). You could figure out how much width to add to the front pieces saving me the effort (LOL!) because as you know my sewing room is in dispose.

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    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    I have always thought the yoke on the playdate dress would lend itself well to pintucks sewn in a crosshatch design …. but then it lends itself well to all sorts of methods.

    You could use tucks on the picnic top instead of gathers to see how that would work. Or make a feature panel on the library dress.

    Deb, are you sure you don’t know how to do this already? I was thinking to put it on the fold even would be a bit tricky as is. You’d have to extend the button placket to almost the crotch placket to do it that way I would think.

    But yes a beautiful little bubble with pintucks makes my mummy heart flutter.

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I was thinking about growth tucks in some of the rectangular skirt dresses, fairy tale, music box, playtime, garden party.

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    Profile photo of Frances SuzanneFrances Suzanne @Frances Suzanne

    @Deb Yes, tucks on the lullaby layette would be super sweet!! Don’t you want to do the math for US?? @withloveheidi Growth tucks = GENIUS!!! Must remember that… @justsewit Sewing crosshatched tucks are in our near future :). We’ve not attempted these yet, so wish us luck!

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    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    @FrancesSuzanne that sounds very exciting – proof that great minds are very much thinking alike here!

    So how are you going to do them? Twin needle? Folded? Please not corded (I don’t know if this will work with a crosshatch). I haven’t done the crosshatch either but I am intrigued and can’t wait for all to be revealed.

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    Profile photo of cybele727cybele727 @cybele727

    Tucks on the garden party dress. That bodice is perfect for that. Some awesome box pleats or narrow pintucks.

    I think for the preteen girls it is a really flattering top because it can disguise new “growth” that they might not yet be comfortable with.

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    Profile photo of DebDeb @Mynorth

    The hem tucks I was referring to are also called growth tucks. I use that method every chance and a tute is here:https://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=5163707322010726966#editor/target=post;postID=5881343318468516870;onPublishedMenu=allposts;onClosedMenu=allposts;postNum=100;src=postname

    As far as the the math for the Lullaby, hey, YOU asked for ideas LOL!

    I’ve tried crosshatching pin tucks. Once with thin cording as filler and once without. While I cannot find my sample, my memory say’s without a filler is better. But once again, that’s for you to determine 🙂

    Looking forward to your up coming post on heirloom techniques!!

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    Profile photo of DebDeb @Mynorth

    Dang… my last post entry was directed to Frances/Suzanne but the link didn’t appear. Ooops.

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    Profile photo of cybele727cybele727 @cybele727

    Deb,
    Maybe it is just me, but when I click on that link, I am told I don’t have access to that account. I think you posted a link that is for the author of a page, and since the blog id is a number, we can’t search for the blog…..

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    Profile photo of DebDeb @Mynorth

    @cybele727
    When I click either link or reply nothing happens.
    I truly think the internet is part voodoo, part magic and for me, most of what I try to do is jinxed 🙂

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    Profile photo of TamaraTamara @justsewit

    Don’t worry Deb, I’ve only just learned how to do it – really savvy me!

    What about a pintucked feature down the side of a pair of trousers?

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    Profile photo of cybele727cybele727 @cybele727

    @Deb
    I still can’t figure out how to insert a link or an attachment of correct size.

    I am like magneto at times. I just approach it and it doesn’t work.

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    Profile photo of DebDeb @Mynorth

    @cybele727 …. can’t do the link or attachment either.
    Maybe we should ask @FrancesSuzanne to do tips on heirloom sewing AND internet stuff. One of them is a graphic designer and can rock the web!

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    Profile photo of Frances SuzanneFrances Suzanne @Frances Suzanne

    Loving this discussion – about heirloom techniques and technology!!! We hope to crosshatch without filler….but since we’ve yet to do it, that is yet to be determined.

    @cybele27 EXCELLENT IDEA on the garden party for the preteen ladies!

    @justsewit Way to include the guys AND girls! A pintuck down the side of a pair of trousers would look quite dapper, wouldn’t it??

    @deb You’re right….we asked for it. So, maybe the lullaby falls into our jurisdiction {and LG would look really cute in one this spring/summer}. As for the link – not sure if I can help, but may email you separately and try :). *Ashley is speechless with the graphic designer accolades you sent her way — she works in print, baby, print!!

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