Oliver + S

what's the most difficult thing you've ever sewn?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 34 total)
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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    And what made it difficult? In the end, was it a triumph or a disaster? Or something in between?

    And as long as I’m asking questions, what’s the next skill or project you want to tackle–but maybe are a little afraid to try?

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    Tamara Hullender @TamaraH

    Great question, Liesl.
    The most difficult thing I’ve ever sewn was a prom dress for my youngest daughter. This dress had a very fitted bodice, full circle skirt, and both a slippery main fabric and sheer accent fabric. Getting the zipper and hem just right were a trick! It was a success, however, there were flaws – only noticeable if really inspecting it. Photo of it is here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/65562388@N02/6050682586/in/album-72157627449457336/

    Tammy

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Ooh, well done @tamarah! My mom sewed me a very similar prom dress: similar silhouette and fabric, but mine was strapless. I recall multiple fittings and many late nights on her part.

    But think of the great memories she’ll have!

    What’s on your “to tackle” list? Anything you’re really wanting to learn?

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    Tamara Hullender @TamaraH

    Thank you, Liesl. She really did love her dress, especially because no one else had anything like it and it had a vintage vibe.
    My tackle list would definitely include honing my skills at getting good fit and I would really like to make a semi-fitted shirt with a collar that includes a collar stand. When I need to dress professionally, a traditional shirt (I usually wear sleeveless just for comfort) under a jacket just feels right. I would like some shirts made in pretty fabrics, rather than just the white, French blue, or pastels that are available ready made. So the learning on such a project would definitely be the two-part collar and placing the darts appropriately for a good fit.

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Well, you’re practically reading my mind! Thanks for the feedback, and I think you’ll be happy with at least one of the fall patterns, then. xo

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    lakepa @lakepa

    The Archer button-up shirt from Grainline Studio is not all that difficult, but it requires accuracy. It’s loosely fitted, not semi-fitted. It has long sleeves, but I’ve made short sleeves and versions with 3/4-length sleeves. Best of all, the collar isn’t too long for petites. Tamara, you can find Grainline Studio under the shop tab above.

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    juliamom2009 @juliamom2009

    Here’s how I roll…

    I learned to sew in 7th grade Home Economics class. I wasn’t particularly good and got a B (which was devastating to me). The summer before high school, I enrolled in a summer class at the high school for sewing. The pattern that I picked – a fully lined fitted blazer. I sewed it in a no-wale brown corduroy. I’m short, so I had to adjust everything for the petite size range. It actually came out good and I wore it proudly. I wish I had kept it for posterity!

    I’d like to make well fitting jeans for myself. It’s pretty much all I wear, and being height challenged, it’s tough to get ones that fit well. Once I do, I wear them to death and beyond.

    And, I won’t even mention my request for a kid’s blazer pattern….and now that I think of it, an adult blazer that I can wear with my jeans.

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    mcholley1 @mcholley1

    I just finished a ‘muslin’ of a blazer to see how it would go. I want to make two for a family wedding and parties in November. I even added a full lining and it was suprisingly straightforward (…even if you weren’t there to hold my hand though the process, Liesl…hint, hint.). There are some straight forward fit issues that I’ll address. However, unless he has a huge growth spurt I need to learn how to shorten the distance between his shoulders and his bust including those curved, set in sleeves. I’m a bit intimidated, but it would be a useful skill as I’m also built the same. I’ll add an art museum set, to make it a full suit.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  mcholley1.
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    mcholley1 @mcholley1

    The blazer…

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    mcholley1 @mcholley1

    See how those armholes are way too deep?

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    Robin @Robin

    Liesl, this made me laugh so much I almost choked on my drink. I was really excited to create samples for you of the “Desktop Wrist Rest Pattern”. I could not get those teeny, tiny oval eyes to have smooth edges. I went through all of the fabric you sent and then used some of my own trying to get 2 eyes that were the same.

    What makes things hard for me? – fine, slippery fabric; trying to pattern match; button holes on thick fabric or plackets; and not understanding fit challenges.

    FBAs and narrow shoulders, thanks to you, not so hard anymore.

    I would love to sew a button up shirt for myself. Cannot buy one with narrow shoulders and large everything else.

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    Rhythm @rhythmtyagi

    The most challenging sewing project I have taken up was a quilt not clothing. I used synthetic batting which was very high loft. Everything that could have gone wrong, did!
    I would love to challenge myself with something like a pair of jeans. It seems very intimidating to me.

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    Tamara @justsewit

    @rhythmtyagi on contemplating answering this post, I was thinking exactly the same as what you have just written! As yet, I have not faced hugely difficult challenges with sewing garments. But quilting a quilt for the first time free motion style was challenging! Well according to the judges at the local agricultural show where I entered said quilt, thought the first effort was pretty jolly good and it was awarded first prize (in the novice section) so maybe my challenge wasn’t that difficult afterall?

    In terms of jeans, I found the craftsy class with Angela Wolf very helpful and have since made four pairs (for the big kids not me) and have several more on the go. The techniques she uses to distress fabric can be used on other items also, like jeans jackets (something I have just traced a pattern for).

    Certain fabrics get me! But then it seems I am not the only one.

    Oh come to think of it, CURTAINS drive me nuts! They might be the easiest most straight forward thing to construct but there is a lot of fabric to work with and calculating it to get it right is a nightmare for one who really doesn’t call herself a mathematician. This is why we enlist the sister who is good at curtains to help😄 And I don’t think I will ever make another roman blind if I can really help it.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Tamara.
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    Enbee @Enbee

    @justsewit, I HATE sewing curtains! I may or may not have several sets currently languishing in my “needs to be finished” pile. I admit nothing.

    Probably the most challenging thing I’ve sewn to date was fitted/all-in-one cloth diapers – it’s what got me back into sewing initially. Prior to getting pregnant, I hadn’t touched a machine in about a decade. But when I could no longer use power tools, I had to satisfy the making urge somehow, and sewing it was. Cloth diapers were probably not the place to start – and then I didn’t even end up using cloth past the first couple of weeks! Ah, well – at least now I own a KAM snap setter. I also fear no elastic.

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    Enbee @Enbee

    As for things to conquer – clothes for myself! That fit! I would really love a button-up shirt that fits well and flatters me- I have broad shoulders and a flat chest, so RTW shirts are either too short in the wrist and tight under the arms, or fit my shoulders but leave me swimming and shapeless elsewhere.

    ETA: I’m mostly reluctant to dive into sewing for myself because my sewing time is so limited, that I’m reluctant to risk a big failure when it means spending a bunch of evenings that I could instead spend sewing clothes for my easygoing toddler.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Enbee.
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